Christopher P. Long

Associate Professor
Management
PhD, Management, Duke UniversityMaster in Public Policy (MPP), Harvard UniversityBA (Hons), Political Science, University of Connecticut
Chris P. Long is an Associate Professor of Management, the Paul Naughton Research Fellow, and the Director of the Executive-in-Residence Program. In his award-winning research, he examines the actions that leaders take within complex and dynamic business environments. His work is aimed at helping leaders understand how to leverage their personal capabilities and optimize their efforts to achieve a wide range of performance objectives. He has extensive experience consulting with multi-national corporations on issues of leadership, organizational design, and organizational change. He holds a PhD in Management from Duke University and a Master in Public Policy from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He has previously held academic positions at Georgetown University, Washington University in St. Louis, and Duke University. While at Georgetown, he was awarded the Joseph F. Lemoine Award for Undergraduate and Graduate Teaching Excellence. This award is given to the top teacher each year at the McDonough School of Business. In addition to his civilian duties, Professor Long currently serves as an Officer (Major) in the United States Army Reserve. In his current position as a Research Psychologist, he conducts research on issues that impact the psychological health and overall efficacy of military personnel.

Teaching Interests

Leadership, Management Consulting, Organizational Change

Research Interests

Leadership, Organizational Control, Fairness, Trust, Organizational Design

Courses Taught

BUS
HON
BUSINESS HONORS: EIRP-UG
BUS
HON_I
BUSINESS HONORS I: EIRP
MGT
700
SEMINAR IN BUSINESS STRATEGY
MGT
2301
ADM & ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

Select Publications

Journal Articles

Cardinal, L. B., Sitkin, S. B., Long, C. P., and Miller, C. C. (2018). The Genesis of Control Configurations during Organizational Founding.. Advances in Strategic Management.

Long, C. P. (2018). To Control and Build Trust: How Managers Use Organizational Controls and Trust-building Activities to Motivate Subordinate Cooperation. Accounting, Organizations, and Society. vol. 70, pp. 69-91.

Horak, S., and Long, C. P. (2018). Dissolving the Paradox: Power and Trust Orthogonality in Collaborative Business Relationships.. Supply Chain Management: An International Review. vol. 23, pp. 573-590.

Long, C. P., and Sitkin, S. B. (2018). Control-Trust Dynamics in Organizations: Identifying Shared Perspectives and Charting Conceptual Faultlines. Academy of Management Annals. vol. 12, pp. 725-751.

Long, C. P. (2016). Mapping the Main Roads to Fairness: Examining the Managerial Context of Fairness-Promotion. Journal of Business Ethics. vol. 137, pp. 757-783.

Karim, S., Carroll, T. N., and Long, C. P. (2016). Delaying Change: Examining How Industry and Management Turbulence Impact Structural Realignment. Academy of Management Journal. vol. 59, pp. 791-817.

Long, C. P., Sitkin, S., Cardinal, L., and Burton, R. (2015). How Controls Influence Organizational Information Processing: Insights from a Computational Modeling Investigation. Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory. vol. 21, pp. 406-436.

Hernandez, M., Long, C. P., and Sitkin, S. (2014). Cultivating Trust in Leaders: Are All Leader Behaviors Equally Influential?. Organization Studies. vol. 35, pp. 1867-1892.

Long, C. P., Bendersky, C., and Morrill, C. (2011). Fairness Monitoring: Contextualizing Fairness Judgments in Organizations. Academy of Management Journal. vol. 54, pp. 1045-1068.

Cardinal, L., Sitkin, S., and Long, C. P. (2004). Balancing and Rebalancing in the Creation and Evolution of Organizational Control. Organization Science. vol. 15, pp. 411-431.

Long, C. P., Burton, R., and Cardinal, L. (2002). Three Controls Are Better Than One: A Simulation Model of Complex Control Systems. Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory. vol. 8, pp. 197-220.

Lewin, A., Long, C. P., and Carroll, T. (1999). The Co-Evolution of New Organizational Forms. Organization Science. vol. 10, pp. 535-550.