Environmental Health & Safety

The primary responsibility of the Department of Environmental Health & Safety is to ensure a healthy and safe University environment, while assuring compliance with local, state and federal environmental and Safety regulations. In conjunction with regulatory requirements, the Department developed and implanted policies and procedures and standards for effective environmental safety and health management.

The Department promotes an awareness of these issues throughout the University and offers training to appropriate members of the University community on environmental Safety issues and policies.

ChemTracker Chemical Inventory System
ChemTracker is a web-based chemical inventory system that employed in St. Albert Hall.  All incoming chemicals are bar-coded and the inventory is assigned to a particular laboratory. ChemTracker can create several reports.  Most helpful are the hazard identification and safety reports.

Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)
Please feel free to click on any of the links below for more MSDS information:

Waste Management Plan
The Waste Management Plan provides a roadmap for the proper management of wastes generated at St. John's University. It contains both requirements of state and federal environmental law as well as University policies. The Plan applies to all of the University's campuses, although the majority of waste generation activities occur at the Queens campus.

Department Contacts

Colleen M. Greaney, Ph.D.
Director of Environmental Health and Safety
St. Albert Hall, Room G-020
718-990-1348
[email protected]

William R. Borgeson
Assistant Director of Environmental Health and Safety
St. Albert Hall, Room G-020
718-990-1815
[email protected]

Learn More

There are two ways to obtain a Certificate of Fitness for Supervision of Chemical Laboratories (C-14):

  1. Take an exam, in person at FDNY headquarters, or
  2. a Self-Certification program administered here at St. John’s, known as the Alternate Issuance Program (AIP).


Certificate of Fitness - AIP (C-14) Requirements

  1. Masters or Doctoral degree in a science related field, or.
  2. Bachelors degree plus 2 years of experience in operation of chemical laboratories
  3. Attend Laboratory Fire Safety Training session (EH&S Training offered bi-monthly in Sciarra Seminar room.)

    - OR -

       4a. Review the  Study Materials for the C-14 Certificate of Fitness for Laboratories
       4b. Review 3RCNY §10-01.
       4c. Review Fire Code Sections 2701-2703 and 2706.
       4d. Review applicable sections of NFPA 45.

Note: All claimed experience must be post baccalaureate.  Any experience gained prior to the receipt of the degree will not be accepted toward meeting the AIP requirements.


Paperwork Requirements for the Certificate of Fitness

  1. Complete the “Take Home Exam” and return to EH&S.
  2. Complete the Notarized Applicant statement.
  3. Obtain a Notarized EH&S statement.
  4. Complete the Fire Department Form A20.
  5. Provide a Photocopy of Diploma in English or a copy of transcript showing degree earned with date.
  6. Provide a 2x2 Color Photo (With your permission, EH&S can obtain your storm card photo).
  7. Complete, print and sign the FDNY Employee Affirmation Form

The self-certification program will allow us to accomplish our goal with regards to Laboratory Supervisors as mandated by the New York Fire Department regulations.
 FDNY Certificate of Fitness Program

In Person Certificate of Fitness (C-14) Program Requirements: 
If you do not meet the education and experience requirements for Self Certification Program, you may take the Examination for the Certificate of Fitness for The Supervision of Chemical Laboratories (C-14) anytime at Fire Department Headquarters at 9 Metro Tech, Brooklyn N.Y. For study material, requirements, directions and further information go to the New York City Fire Department.

**Please note: Reference material should be studied before exam date.** 



Certificate of Fitness Renewals: 

  • If you are currently in the EH&S Certificate of Fitness database, your renewal will be processed and paid for by St. John’s University. Kindly deliver to EH&S any renewal notices mailed to your home. Call EH&S to verify that your name is listed in the database.
  • If you discover that you are not in the EH&S database, EH&S will then enter your name and all renewal fees will be paid by St. John’s University. Kindly deliver to EH&S any renewal notices mailed to your home.
  • If your Certificate of Fitness is expired by less than 1 year, call EH&S to renew your C of F, which will be paid for by St. John’s University.
  • If your Certificate of Fitness is expired for more than 1 year, you will be required to re-submit all C of F required documentation, or to retake the C-14 test.
  • Laboratory Satellite Accumulation Signage (PDF)
  • Peroxide Forming Compound Policy (PDF)
  • Personal Protective Equipment Policy (PDF)
  • Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) Selection List (PDF)
  • Satellite Storage Accumulation Area – Weekly Inspection Checklist (PDF)

Certificate of Fitness Requirements and Study Materials

There are two ways to obtain a Certificate of Fitness for Supervision of Chemical Laboratories (C-14):

  1. Take an exam, in person at FDNY headquarters, or
  2. a Self-Certification program administered here at St. John’s, known as the Alternate Issuance Program (AIP).

Certificate of Fitness - AIP (C-14) Requirements

  1. Masters or Doctoral degree in a science related field, or.
  2. Bachelors degree plus 2 years of experience in operation of chemical laboratories
  3. Attend Laboratory Fire Safety Training session (EH&S Training offered bi-monthly in Sciarra Seminar room.)

- OR -

4a. Review the Study Materials for the C-14 Certificate of Fitness for Laboratories
4b. Review 3RCNY §10-01.
4c. Review Fire Code Sections 2701-2703 and 2706.
4d. Review applicable sections of NFPA 45.

Note: All claimed experience must be post baccalaureate. Any experience gained prior to the receipt of the degree will not be accepted toward meeting the AIP requirements.

Paperwork Requirements for the Certificate of Fitness

  1. Complete the “Take Home Exam” and return to EH&S.
  2. Complete the Notarized Applicant statement.
  3. Obtain a Notarized EH&S statement.
  4. Complete the Fire Department Form A20.
  5. Provide a Photocopy of Diploma in English or a copy of transcript showing degree earned with date.
  6. Provide a 2x2 Color Photo (With your permission, EH&S can obtain your storm card photo).
  7. Complete, print and sign the FDNY Employee Affirmation Form

The self-certification program will allow us to accomplish our goal with regards to Laboratory Supervisors as mandated by the New York Fire Department regulations. FDNY Certificate of Fitness Program

In Person Certificate of Fitness (C-14) Program Requirements: If you do not meet the education and experience requirements for Self Certification Program, you may take the Examination for the Certificate of Fitness for The Supervision of Chemical Laboratories (C-14) anytime at Fire Department Headquarters at 9 Metro Tech, Brooklyn N.Y. For study material, requirements, directions and further information go to the New York City Fire Department website.

**Please note: Reference material should be studied before exam date.**

Certificate of Fitness Renewals:

  • If you are currently in the EH&S Certificate of Fitness database, your renewal will be processed and paid for by St. John’s University. Kindly deliver to EH&S any renewal notices mailed to your home. Call EH&S to verify that your name is listed in the database.
  • If you discover that you are not in the EH&S database, EH&S will then enter your name and all renewal fees will be paid by St. John’s University. Kindly deliver to EH&S any renewal notices mailed to your home.
    If your Certificate of Fitness is expired by less than 1 year, call EH&S to renew your C of F, which will be paid for by St. John’s University.
  • If your Certificate of Fitness is expired for more than 1 year, you will be required to re-submit all C of F required documentation, or to retake the C-14 test.

The St. John’s University Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) has been established as part of the overall Laboratory Safety Program in order to minimize the risk from laboratory use of hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this CHP is to define work practices and procedures to help ensure that faculty, students, staff and other employees are protected from the hazards associated with the handling, storage, and use of hazardous chemicals in the laboratories.  This Plan addresses the requirements of St. John's University policy and the OSHA Laboratory Standard.

This Waste Management Plan is intended to provide a roadmap for the proper management of wastes generated at St. John’s University.  It contains both requirements of state and federal environmental law as well as University policies.  The Plan applies to all of the University’s campuses, although the majority of waste generation activities occur at the Queens campus. 

The University generated wastes are divided into the following 6 categories:

Brief descriptions of each waste type are contained within this site.  Once you have located your particular waste type, click on the type and you will find requirements for handling, storage and disposal.

The Plan is maintained by the University’s Environmental, Health and Safety (EH&S) Department.  Questions regarding the content or use of the Plan should be directed to the Director, Department of Environmental Health and Safety.

A list of names of people responsible for implementing this waste management plan may be found in Appendix A.

* Construction and demolition debris are handled on a project-specific basis.

The Institutional Biosafety Committee reviews research involving recombinant DNA, gene transfer, and select biological agents and toxins. This review is mandated by the NIH and is intended to provide local, institutional oversight of nearly all forms of research utilizing recombinant DNA, infectious agents, and other potentially hazardous agents such as carcinogens. 

Generally the IBC seeks to review research where:

  • Drug resistance traits are deliberately transferred to microorganisms that are not known to acquire the trait naturally, especially if such acquisition could compromise the use of drugs to control the disease agent in humans, veterinary medicine, or agriculture.
  • Recombinant genetic constructs are deliberately created for the biosynthesis of toxin molecules lethal for vertebrates at an LD50 of less than 100 nanograms per kilogram of body weight.
  • Recombinant DNA, or DNA or RNA is deliberately transferred into one or more human research subjects.

Institutions that fail to comply, risk the following:

  • Suspension, limitation, or termination of financial assistance for:
    • noncompliant NIH projects
    • NIH funding for other recombinant DNA research at the institution
  • Having to obtain prior NIH approval for any recombinant DNA projects

Experiments are exempt when they involve recombinant DNA that is:

  • Not in organisms and viruses,
  • Entirely from a prokaryotic host, including its indigenous plasmids or viruses when propagated only in that host or when transferred to another host by well-established physiological means,
  • Entirely from a eukaryotic host, including its chloroplasts, mitochondria, or plasmids when propagated only in that host or a closely related strain of the same species,
  • Entirely segments from different species that exchange DNA by known physiological processes, though one or more may be a synthetic equivalent; see Appendix A of the NIH Guidelines; or
  • Not a significant risk to health or the environment, as listed on the “Select Agents and Toxins” list from the National Select Agent Registry

Biosafety

St. John's IBC Policy and Procedures

Registration Form for Infectious or Hazardous Biological Agents

Select Agent and Toxin Security Form

National Institutes of Health (NIH) Guidelines for research involving Recombinant DNA