Peter P. and Margaret A. D'Angelo Chair

Students and faculty at all levels enjoy a more vibrant academic experience when their university engages them with leading authors, scholars and thinkers from a wide spectrum of academia, government and private industry.

This is the aim of the Peter P. and Margaret A. D’Angelo Chair in the Humanities at St. John’s University. Peter P. D’Angelo ‘78MBA, ‘06HON, and Margaret LaRosa D’Angelo ‘70Ed established the Chair in 2007. It draws high-profile, multi- and cross-disciplinary visiting professors to St. John’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences — the University’s oldest division — for a semester of teaching and scholarly exchange.

Visiting professors appointed to the Peter P. and Margaret A. D’Angelo Chair will be rotated among the various humanities departments in St. John’s College. The agreement between the D’Angelos and the University offers the following definition of the humanities:

“The humanities are a group of academic subjects united by a commitment to studying aspects of the human condition and a qualitative approach that generally prevents a single paradigm from coming to define any discipline. The humanities are usually distinguished from the social sciences and the natural sciences and include subjects such as Classics, English, History, Languages, Literature, Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies.”

Contact

Jeffrey W. Fagen, Ph.D., Dean
St. John’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
718-990-6217
[email protected]

Peter P. and Margaret A. D'Angelo Chair

Hasia R. Diner

Hasia R. Diner

Hasia R. Diner, Paul S. and Sylvia Steinberg Professor of American Jewish History, Director of the Goldstein-Goren Center for American Jewish History, and the Interim Director of Glucksman Ireland House at New York University, is one of the foremost experts on the history of immigration and migration to the United States. She joins the History faculty of St. John’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences as the 2019 Peter and Margaret D’Angelo Chair in the Humanities.

Diner has actively shaped the field of American Jewish history, and her scholarship situates Jews as part of the fabric of American immigration, politics, and urban life. She has also played a leading role in studying the history of immigration to the United States and the phenomena of global migration. Over the course of her prolific career, Diner has written twelve books, edited four volumes, and composed numerous articles. She lectures widely on American Jewish history, American immigration history, and women's history. Diner has won several prestigious awards, including the Guggenheim Fellowship in Humanities for Intellectual and Cultural History (2011), and has been a fellow at the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Research, the American Academy of Jewish Research, and the Society of American Historians. Her book We Remember with Reverence and Love: American Jews and the Myth of Silence after the Holocaust, 1945-1962 (2009) won the 2009 National Jewish Book Award in American Jewish Studies and the Saul Viener Prize of American Jewish Historical Society. Diner’s work Roads Taken: The Great Jewish Migrations to the New World and the Peddlers who Forged the Way (2015) was a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award.

Diner’s books tracing the landscape of Jewish American history include: The Jews of the United States (2004); Her Works Praise Her: A History of Jewish Women in America from Colonial Times to the Present (2002); Remembering the Lower East Side: American Jewish Reflections (2000); The Lower East Side Memories: The Jewish Place in America (2000); A New Promised Land: A History of the Jews in America (1998) for young readers; A Time for Gathering. 1820-1880: The Second Migration, Vol. 2 in, The Jewish People in America (1995); and In an Almost Promised Land: American Jews and Blacks, 1915-1935 (1995). Her works on immigration to the United States include: From Arrival to Incorporation: Migrants to the U.S. in a Global Age (2007); Hungering for America: Italian, Irish, and Jewish Foodways in the Age of Migration (2002); and Erin’s Daughters in America: Irish Immigrant Women in the Nineteenth Century (1984).

Diner holds a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Chicago and an M.A. from the University of Chicago.  She received a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin. 

During the Spring 2019, she will teach an undergraduate course, America: A Nation of Immigrants, focusing on immigration as an integral part of American history. Diner will also deliver two public lectures on the Queens and Staten Island Campuses:

Queens Campus

“Twinned Histories: Irish and Jewish Immigrants to the United States”

Thursday, March 28, 2019

1:50 pm (Common Hour)

Marillac Auditorium

Staten Island Campus

“Twinned Histories: Irish and Jewish Immigrants to the United States”

Thursday, March 14, 2019

1:50 pm (Common Hour)

Kelleher Center, Kiernan Suite

For additional information, please contact Patricia Marchia at 718-990-6272 or [email protected].

Established in 2007, the Peter P. and Margaret A. D’Angelo Chair in the Humanities promotes excellence in teaching and scholarly exchange.

Lee A. McBride III

Lee A. McBride III

Lee A. McBride III, Associate Professor of Philosophy at The College of Wooster (Wooster, OH), has earned recognition for his provocative work in insurrectionist ethics, resistance to oppression, and the philosophy of race. He joins the Philosophy faculty of St. John’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences as the 2018 Peter and Margaret D’Angelo Chair in the Humanities.

McBride specializes in American philosophy, ethics, and political philosophy. He teaches courses in American pragmatism, African American philosophy, philosophy of race, feminist philosophy, political philosophy, environmental ethics, philosophy of food, ancient Greek philosophy, and continental philosophy. McBride was elected to the board of directors for both the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy (2014-2017) and the William James Society (2012-2015). He is a member of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy’s Committee on Public Philosophy (2017-2020) and previously served on the American Philosophical Association’s Committee on the Status of Black Philosophers (2014-2017).

A prolific author of book chapters and journal articles on classical American figures such as Henry David Thoreau, John Dewey, and Alain Locke, McBride’s most recent research draws upon the work of Leonard Harris, María Lugones, and Angela Davis. He is currently editing a collection of Leonard Harris’s insurrectionist philosophy and working on a book tentatively titled Bold Comportment: Forays in Insurrectionist Ethics. McBride was guest editor for a symposium on insurrectionist ethics in the Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society (49, no. 1, Winter 2013), and his recent and forthcoming publications include: “Race, Multiplicity, and Impure Coalitions of Resistance,” Philosophizing the Americas: An Inter-American Discourse, eds. Jacoby Adeshei Carter and Hernando A. Estévez (Fordham, forthcoming); “Anger and Approbation,” Moral Psychology of Anger, eds. Myisha Cherry and Owen Flanagan (Rowman & Littlefield, forthcoming); “New Descriptions, New Possibilities,” Journal of Speculative Philosophy, 32, no. 1 (forthcoming); “Leftist Democratic Politics,” Jahrbuch Praktische Philosophie in globaler Perspektive / Yearbook Practical Philosophy in a Global Perspective, eds. Michael Reder, Dominik Finkelde, Alexander Filipovic, and Johannes Wallacher (Verlag Karl Alber, 2017); “Insurrectionist Ethics and Racism,” The Oxford Handbook of Race and Philosophy, ed. Naomi Zack (Oxford, 2017); “Insurrectionist Ethics and Thoreau,” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, 49, no. 1 (2013); and “Agrarian Ideals and Practices,” Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics, 25, no. 4 (2012).

McBride holds a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Purdue University. He received a B.A. from the Integral Program at Saint Mary’s College in Moraga, CA, and his M.A. in Philosophy is from Claremont Graduate University.

During the Spring 2018, he will teach an undergraduate seminar focusing on the role of fallibilism and experimental logic in insurrectionist resistance to oppression. He will also deliver two public lectures on the Queens and Staten Island Campuses:

Queens Campus

"Empathy or Insurrection: Boldly Confronting Oppression"

Monday, April 9, 2018

1:50 pm (Common Hour)

D'Angelo Center, Room 206

Staten Island Campus

"Empathy or Insurrection: Boldly Confronting Oppression"

Thursday, March 22, 2018

1:50 pm (Common Hour)

Kelleher Center, Kiernan Suite

For additional information, please contact Patricia Marchia at 718-990-6272 or [email protected].

Established in 2007, the Peter P. and Margaret A. D’Angelo Chair in the Humanities promotes excellence in teaching and scholarly exchange.

Agnes M. Brazal

An associate professor of theology and research fellow at De la Salle University, Manila, Philippines, Agnes M. Brazal, S.T.L., S.T.D., has earned recognition as a prolific scholar in feminist and migration theological ethics and methods of doing intercultural and postcolonial theologies. She joins the Theology and Religious Studies faculty in St. John’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences as the 2017 Peter and Margaret D’Angelo Chair in the Humanities at St. John’s University.

Brazal is past President and founding member of the DaKaTeo (Catholic Theological Society of the Philippines) and one of the first coordinators and "mothers" of the Ecclesia of Women in Asia, an association of Catholic women theologians in Asia. She has been a planning committee member of the Catholic Theological Ethics in the World Church since 2007, and has served on the editorial board of Theological Studies, Asian Christian Review, and Budhi. In addition, Brazal is an international advisory board member for the publication, Louvain Studies.

The recipient of numerous honors, Brazal is a productive researcher. Her accolades include the 2003 MWI (Institute of Missiology, Missio, Aachen) prize for the international academic essay contest on Contextual Theology and Philosophy on the theme “Religious Identity and Migration,” and her book, Body and Sexuality, was a finalist in the 2007 National Book Award (Manila Critics Circle and the National Book Development Board). Her publications include: a co-authored volume, Intercultural Church: Bridge of Solidarity in the Migration Context

(Borderless Press, 2015); and co-edited volumes, Theology and Power (Paulist Press, 2016), Living with (out) Borders: Catholic Theological Ethics on the Migrations of Peoples (Orbis Books, 2016), The Second Plenary Council of the Philippines: Quo Vadis? (Ateneo de Manila   University Press, 2016), Church in the Age of Global Migration: A Moving Body (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), Feminist Cyberethics in Asia: Religious Discourses on Human Connectivity (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), Transformative Theological Ethics: East Asian Contexts (Ateneo de Manila University Press, 2010), Faith on the Move: Toward a Theology of Migration in Asia (Ateneo de Manila University Press, 2008), and Body and Sexuality: Theological-Pastoral Reflections of Women in Asia (Ateneo de Manila University Press, 2007). She has also published articles in journals such as Theological Studies, Concilium, Questions Liturgiques, Asian Christian Review, Asian Horizons, andHapag.

Brazal earned her bachelor’s degree from the Ateneo de Manila University and her S.T.L. /M.A. and S.T.D./Ph.D. from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.  She is teaching both an undergraduate and a graduate seminar on Migration: Theological and Ethical Challenges that will address the theological and ethical issues emerging from the phenomenon of human migration today. Brazal will also deliver two public lectures during the Spring 2017 semester.

Queens Campus
"Does Capitalism Kill? Critical Perspectives 50 Years after Populorum Progressio (Pope Paul VI’s Encyclical on the Development of Peoples).”
Thursday, March 30, 2017
1:50 pm (Common Hour)
D’Angelo Center, Room 206

Staten Island Campus
"Does Capitalism Kill? Critical Perspectives 50 Years after Populorum Progressio (Pope Paul VI’s Encyclical on the Development of Peoples).”
Monday, April 3, 2017
1:50 pm (Common Hour)
Kelleher Center, Kiernan Suite

For additional information, please contact Patricia Marchia at 718-990-6272  or [email protected].

Established in 2007, the Peter P. and Margaret A. D’Angelo Chair in the Humanities promotes excellence in teaching and scholarly exchange.

Dr. LuMing Mao

A professor of English and Asian/Asian American Studies and chair of the English department at Miami University, LuMing Mao, Ph.D., has earned recognition as a scholar-teacher of comparative rhetoric, cultural studies, and Asian/American rhetorics. He joins the English faculty in St. John’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences as the 2016 Peter and Margaret D’Angelo Chair in the Humanities at St. John’s University.

Mao’s research has been centrally located in the intersectionalities of rhetoric, writing, linguistics, culture, history, and philosophy, and he has articulated a new kind of comparative rhetorical theory, one that enacts a discursive interdependence-in-difference. Mao’s work has both challenged Euro-American conceptions of Chinese and Asian/Asian American rhetorics and provided new methods of analysis for transforming dominant narratives of rhetoric in general and for depicting diverse rhetorical experiences of Chinese and Asian/Asian Americans in particular. His “art of recontextualization,” a method that relies on terms of interdependence and interconnectivity to constitute and regulate representation of all discursive practices, has contributed to a more dynamic, multidimensional understanding of the relationship between the local and the global, the self and the other, the digital and the alphabetic, and the cultural and the material. Mao currently is writing a book entitled Searching for a Tertium Quid: Studying Chinese Rhetoric in the Present and co-editing the Norton Anthology of Rhetoric and Writing.

The recipient of numerous honors---including the Distinguished Scholar Award from Miami University in 2015 and the Honorable Mention for the MLA 2008 Mina P. Shaughnessy Prize for the co-edited volume Representations: Doing Asian American Rhetoric--- Mao is a prolific author. His most recent publications include: the Chinese edition of his Reading Chinese Fortune Cookie: the Making of Chinese American Rhetoric (2013); an edited collection, Comparative Rhetoric: The Art of Traversing Rhetorical Times, Places, and Spaces (2014); essays in Rhetoric Society Quarterly (2013) and PMLA (2014); and a co-edited symposium on comparative rhetoric in Rhetoric Review (2015).

Mao earned his bachelor’s degree from East China Normal University and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. He is teaching an undergraduate and a graduate seminar on Comparative Rhetoric: Re-Presenting the Other at St. John’s during the spring 2016 semester. He also will deliver these public lectures:

Queens Campus
“The Art of Recontextualization: Engaging the Rhetorics of the Other Comparatively”
Thursday, April 21, 2016
1:50 pm (Common Hour)
D’Angelo Center, Room 206

Staten Island Campus
“Images of Hybridity: Visualizing China through a Rhetoric of Becoming”
Monday, March 14, 2016
1:50 pm (Common Hour)
Kelleher Center, Kiernan Suite

For additional information, please contact Patricia Marchia at 718-990-6272 or [email protected].

Established in 2007, the Peter P. and Margaret A. D’Angelo Chair in the Humanities promotes excellence in teaching and scholarly exchange.

Stephen A. Aron

A professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles, who has earned recognition as an authority on the western United States, Stephen A. Aron, Ph.D., is the 2015 Peter and Margaret D’Angelo Endowed Chair in the Humanities at St. John’s University. He joins the history faculty in St. John’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Dr. Aron’s research primarily focuses on frontiers and borderlands in North America. He is chair of western history at the Autry Institute for the Study of the American West, which he previously also served as executive director. In addition, is vice chair for academic personnel at UCLA and has taught at Princeton University.

Dr. Aron has sought to bridge the divide between academic and public history. Toward this end, he has participated in the American Historical Association’s “What I Do” series and joined a panel discussion on history museums at the Smithsonian, which aired on CSPAN. He currently is writing a book entitled Can We All Get Along: An Alternative History of American Wests.

The recipient of numerous honors and fellowships—including distinguished speaker at the Western History Association in 2013 and fellow and visiting professor at the Université de Paris 1 (Panthéon-Sorbonne) in 2008—Dr. Aron is a prolific author. His books include The American West: A Very Short Introduction (2014); American Confluence: The Missouri Frontier from Borderland to Border State (2006); and How the West Was Lost: The Transformation of Kentucky from Daniel Boone to Henry Clay(1996). He co-edited the volume, Trading Cultures: The Worlds of Western Merchants(2001); and was the co-general editor of Worlds Together, Worlds Apart: A History of the World from the Beginnings of Humankind to the Present, vol. 2 (2002).

Dr. Aron earned his bachelor’s degree from Amherst College and his Ph.D. in History from the University of California, Berkeley. At St. John’s University during the spring 2015 semester, he will teach an undergraduate and a graduate seminar on the history of the American west. He also will deliver these public lectures:  

 Queens Campus
“The Wishtory and History of the American Frontier”
Thursday, April 16, 2015
1:50 p.m. (Common Hour)
D’Angelo Center, Room 206

Staten Island Campus
“The Wishtory and History of the American Frontier”
Thursday, April 9, 2015
1:50 p.m. (Common Hour)
Kelleher Center, Kiernan Suite

For additional information, please contact Ms. Patricia Marchia at 718-990-6272 or [email protected].

Established in 2007, the Peter P. and Margaret A. D’Angelo Chair in the Humanities promotes excellence in teaching and scholarly exchange.

Peter Steinfels

Author, educator, and journalist, Peter Steinfels was a founding co-director of the Center on Religion and Culture at Fordham University, where he is a University Professor Emeritus.  He has been a visiting professor at Georgetown University, the University of Notre Dame, and the University of Dayton.  From 1988 to 1997 he was senior religion correspondent at The New York Timesand created its “Beliefs” column on religion and ethics, which he wrote for twenty years. 

Dr. Steinfels co-directed a three-year research program on American Catholics in the Public Square, funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts.  In addition to his work at the intersection of religion and contemporary culture, his interests include political theory, international politics, modern American and European religious history, bioethics, and health care.  An editor of Commonweal before going to The Times, Dr. Steinfels is the author of A People Adrift: The Crisis of the Roman Catholic Church in America (1993) and The Neoconservatives (1979), a pioneering study reissued last year with a new Foreword. 

In 2003, he and his wife, Margaret O’Brien Steinfels, who served for fifteen years as editor of Commonweal and co-directs the Fordham Center, were the recipients of the Laetare Medal for service to the church and society from the University of Notre Dame.

Dr. Steinfels earned his bachelor’s degree from Loyola University in Chicago and his Ph.D. in European history from Columbia University.


As the third person to hold the Peter and Margaret D’Angelo Endowed Chair in the Humanities at St. John’s, Peter Steinfels will teach a graduate theology course, Religion and Public Culture and deliver public lectures during the Spring 2014 semester.

“Secularization and its Discontents: Is ‘Secular” a Four-Letter Word?”
Thursday, February 27
1:50 p.m. (Common Hour)
D’Angelo Center, Room 206
Queens Campus

“Secularization and its Discontents: Is ‘Secular” a Four-Letter Word?”
Monday, April 7
1:50 p.m. (Common Hour)
Kelleher Center, Kiernan Suite
Staten Island Campus

For additional information, please contact Ms. Patricia Marchia at 718-990-6272 or [email protected].

Established in 2007, the Peter P. and Margaret A. D’Angelo Chair in the Humanities promotes excellence in teaching and scholarly exchange.

 

Alice McDermott

A three-time Pulitzer Prize nominee and National Book Award winner, author Alice McDermott has been named to the 2012 Peter and Margaret D’Angelo Endowed Chair in  the Humanities at St. John’s University.

Ms. McDermott is the second person named to the Chair, which was established in 2007 by Peter P. D’Angelo ‘78MBA, ‘06HON, and Margaret La Rosa D’Angelo ‘70Ed. The Chair brings leading authors, researchers and scholars from various disciplines to St. John’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the University’s oldest division.

As Chair, Ms. McDermott will serve as a faculty member in the English Department from March 19 to April 27, 2012. In addition to meeting with students and professors, she will teach an intensive fiction-writing workshop for qualified undergraduates and will deliver two public lectures.

A celebrated author, Ms. McDermott currently serves as the Richard A. Macksey Professor for Distinguished Teaching in the Humanities at Johns Hopkins University. Her latest novel, After This, was a finalist for the 2006 Pulitzer Prize. Her fifth novel, Child of My Heart, was a Book-of-the-Month Club main selection and was listed among Book Magazine’s “Ten Best Novels of 2002.”

Ms. McDermott’s novels include A Bigamist’s Daughter,  That Night — a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and At Weddings and Wakes, also nominated for a Pulitzer. In addition, Charming Billy won the 1988 National Book Award as well as the American Book Award.

Ms. McDermott also is the author of numerous articles and short stories, which have appeared in leading publications such as The New Yorker, The Atlantic and the New York Times.

John F. Haught, Ph. D.

A Distinguished Research Professor at Georgetown University, John F. Haught, Ph.D., is the first person named to the Peter and Margaret D’Angelo Endowed Chair in the Humanities at St. John’s University. Established in 2007 by Peter P. D’Angelo ‘78MBA, ‘06HON, and Margaret La Rosa D’Angelo ‘70Ed., the Chair brings leading authors, researchers and scholars from various disciplines to St. John’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the University’s oldest division.

A recognized scholar in the fields of science and religion, Haught’s area of specialization is systematic theology, with a particular interest in issues pertaining to science, cosmology, evolution, ecology, and religion. He is the author of numerous books, including: Is Nature Enough? Meaning and Truth in the Age of Science(Cambridge University Press, 2006); Purpose, Evolution, and the Meaning of Life(Pandora Press, 2004); Deeper Than Darwin: The Prospects for Religion in the Age of Evolution (Westview Press, 2003); and God After Darwin: A Theology of Evolution (Westview Press, 2000; 2nd edition 2007). Haught has also authored numerous articles and reviews and has lectured internationally on many issues related to science and religion. He is the recipient of the Owen Garrigan Award in Science and Religion from Seton Hall University (2002), the Sophia Award for Theological Excellence from the Washington Theological Union (2004), and a Friend of Darwin Award from the National Center for Science Education (2008). Haught testified for the plaintiffs in the Harrisburg, PA “Intelligent Design trial” (Kitzmiller et al. vs. Dover Board of Education, 2005).

As the first person to hold the Peter and Margaret D’Angelo Endowed Chair for the Humanities at St. John’s, Haught will teach an undergraduate philosophy course, Science and Religion: A Philosophical Analysis, and deliver public lectures during the Fall 2008 semester.

Science, Religion, and the Quest for Cosmic Purpose

Thursday, October 16, 2008
4 p.m.
Bent Hall 277
Queens Campus

Science, Faith, and the New Atheism

Tuesday, November 18, 2008
7 p.m.
Kelleher Center - Kiernan Suite
Staten Island Campus

Established in 2007, the Peter P. and Margaret A. D’Angelo Chair in the Humanities promotes excellence in teaching and scholarly exchange.