Student Handbook

The Student Handbook, is the official publication of St. John's University, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, which supplies a comprehensive guide to University specific and College specific information with regard to student life, as well as important procedures and regulations that each student is expected to become familiar with and follow.

Doctor of Pharmacy Specific Policies, Procedures, and Documentation

College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Academic Fairness Procedure

When a student has an academic complaint or grievance he/she is to try and resolve it with the faculty member involved. If unsuccessful, he/she goes to the Department Chairman and if still unresolved, the Dean. Should the student still be dissatisfied he/she may submit a formal complaint or grievance to the Academic Fairness Committee. The Chairperson of the Academic Fairness Committee will decide if the complaint warrants a hearing. There is no appeal with regards to this decision.

If a hearing is granted, three members of the nine member committee will preside. The committee is appointed by the Faculty Council of the College and each member serves a one year term. A faculty member against whom a grievance has been filed will be informed in writing of the grievance by the committee chairperson in sufficient detail and time to give him/her an opportunity to prepare for the meeting. The faculty member may be assisted by an advisor of his/her choice. The faculty member will have an opportunity to present evidence, witnesses, and to hear and question adverse witnesses.
All matters on which a recommendation may be based must be introduced as evidence at the proceedings and the recommendations will be based solely on such material. The committee will reach its recommendation within 15 school days based on a fair preponderance of credible evidence. A notice of the recommendation will be sent to the student, faculty member and others involved in the informal procedure.

It must be stressed that the recommendation is only persuasive in nature. At no time can a faculty member be forced to change a grade. The whole procedure is geared to show a faculty members when his/her peers agree or disagree on particular academic actions that have been challenged by his/her students.

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Academic Standing Criteria for the Doctor of Pharmacy Program

Academic Standing for the Pre-Professional Years (First and Second Year Pharmacy Students)

Good academic standing for students in the Doctor of Pharmacy Program is a 2.0 overall grade point average at the conclusion of the first semester of the freshman year. Thereafter, students are required to maintain a 2.3 overall and math/science/professional GPA for the duration of their studies in the Doctor of Pharmacy program.

For students who entered the Doctor of Pharmacy program in or after the Fall 2015 semester, a math/science/professional GPA of 3.0 or better is required for eligibility to interview for progression into the first professional year (3rd year) of the program.   All other students will be evaluated for eligibility on a case by case basis.

Additional Academic Standing Criteria for Students who Entered the First Professional Year (3rd Year) Prior to the Fall 2015 Semester

Students are required to maintain an overall and math/science/professional GPA of a 2.3 for the duration of their study in the Doctor of Pharmacy program.

Additional Academic Standing Criteria for Students who Entered the First Professional Year (3rd Year) In or After the Fall 2015 Semester (but before the Fall 2018)

Once progressed into the first professional year (3rd year) of the pharmacy program,  students may receive no more than three (3) letter grades below a C- in the professional phase of the pharmacy program (years 3 – 6). If a student receives two letter grades less than C-, the student will be placed on an academic success plan. If a student receives a fourth grade less than C-, the student will be referred to the Doctor of Pharmacy Progression Committee and be subject to dismissal from the Pharmacy Program. In addition, students are required to have an overall grade point average of 2.0 to remain in good academic standing and to graduate from the program.

Additional Academic Standing Criteria for Students who Entered the First Professional Year (3rd Year) In or After the Fall 2018 Semester

Once progressed into the first professional year (3rd year) of the pharmacy program,  students may receive no more than three (3) letter grades below a C in the professional phase of the pharmacy program (years 3 – 6). If a student receives two letter grades less than C, the student will be placed on an academic success plan. If a student receives a fourth grade less than C, the student will be referred to the Doctor of Pharmacy Progression Committee and be subject to dismissal from the Pharmacy Program. 

In addition, all professional courses with a letter grade less than C will be considered an inadequate grade and will be treated as if the student failed the course (except for GPA calculation).  Students will be required to repeat the course and will not be permitted to take courses for which the course with the inadequate grade is a pre-requisite.  Students who fail to receive an adequate grade (letter grade greater than C) after two attempts will be subject to dismissal. 

Students are required to maintain an overall grade point average of 2.0 to remain in good academic standing and to graduate from the program. 

 

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Appeals Process

Process for Appealing of Dismissals from the Doctor of Pharmacy Program

Students who are dismissed from the Doctor of Pharmacy program based upon academic performance or failure to adequate progress have the right to appeal the dismissal decision. All appeals of dismissal decisions must be addressed to the Dean of the College of Pharmacy and Health Professions in writing no later than 10 business days of being notified of the dismissal. Appeals to continue in the Doctor of Pharmacy program should be based upon one of two criteria: to correct “errors of fact” or to provide further evidence to support the student’s continuation in the program that the individuals rendering the dismissal decision may not have been aware of at the time the decision was rendered.

Upon receipt of the written appeal, the Dean will render a decision to either uphold the dismissal decision or to allow the student to continue his/her studies in the pharmacy program based upon conditions established by the Dean. The Dean may wish to discuss the dismissal appeal with the student in person but is not obligated to do so. Decisions regarding appeal requests will be rendered in a timely fashion after consideration of the appeal and any supporting evidence provided.

Students who have continued in the pharmacy program based upon an appeal of a previous dismissal decision do not have right to appeal subsequent dismissal decisions.

All appeal decisions rendered by the Dean are considered final. When appeal decisions are denied, students will be required to transfer to another major within the University if they wish to continue their studies at St. John’s University.

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Block Scheduling Policy

To ensure that all students are able to enroll in all required courses including all required didactic classes and laboratories, the Doctor of Pharmacy Program utilizes “block scheduling” for students beginning in the Spring semester of the 2nd year.

Students are provided with various “block” options of schedules for each semester. Students are asked to evaluate these schedules and rank them according to their preference (with “1” being your first preference, “2” being their second choice, and so on) on the form provided. These block ranking forms are expected to be returned to the student’s academic advisor at the time of their registration appointment.

At the end of the advisement session, students will be placed in a particular block based upon a randomized ranking. This will ensure equal opportunity for students to receive their top rankings. Students requiring special schedules may request special consideration for priority placement only under extraordinary circumstances and with proper documentation and University approval (ie. Student meets the American with Disabilities Act for special educational requirements). Due to the tremendous number of students requesting special accommodations, no consideration can be given to those students requesting particular schedules to accommodate work, travel or religious related issues.

Students often wish to take classes with their friends. If this is the case, students may request to be “linked” with particular individuals. If students wishes to “link” with their friends, all individuals must sign each others schedule rank form and submit identical schedule rankings. PLEASE NOTE – linking with individuals will often result in a student receiving a lower placement ranking. Students who “link” as a group are placed into blocks according to the student with the LOWEST randomized number (ie. if two students link and one student was to be registered 12th in the class and the second was to be registered 100th, both students will be registered at the 100th spot). In addition, please note that blocks reach capacity quickly and large groups are often delegated to the few “block schedules” that remain at the end of placement. In some instances in which blocks have only a few available spaces, "links" with students cannot be accommodated and linked students will have to be separated (we will make every effort not to break up links but we must adhere to the maximum capacity of blocks).

Once schedules are determined and students are registered into courses, the block schedules are considered to be finalized and should not be altered by students. Once students are placed in their schedule, they may request special consideration for altering their schedule. If this is the case, students should submit their request in writing to their advisor with the reason for the request. Requests will only be granted for legitimate reasons and if space accommodations and established classroom limits allow such changes.

Questions regarding block scheduling should be referred to the student’s academic advisor during registration appointments.

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Code of Ethics for Pharmacists

Preamble
Pharmacists are health professionals who assist individuals in making the best use of medications. This Code, prepared and supported by pharmacists, is intended to state publicly the principles that form the fundamental basis of the roles and responsibilities of pharmacists. These principles, based on moral obligations and virtues, are established to guide pharmacists in relationships with patients, health professionals, and society.

Principles
I. A pharmacist respects the covenantal relationship between the patient and pharmacist.
Interpretation: Considering the patient-pharmacist relationship as a covenant means that a pharmacist has moral obligations in response to the gift of trust received from society. In return for this gift, a pharmacist promises to help individuals achieve optimum benefit from their medications, to be committed to their welfare, and to maintain their trust.

II. A pharmacist promotes the good of every patient in a caring, compassionate, and confidential manner.
Interpretation: A pharmacist places concern for the well-being of the patient at the center of professional practice. In doing so, a pharmacist considers needs stated by the patient as well as those defined by health science. A pharmacist is dedicated to protecting the dignity of the patient. With a caring attitude and a compassionate spirit, a pharmacist focuses on serving the patient in a private and confidential manner.

III. A pharmacist respects the autonomy and dignity of each patient.
Interpretation: A pharmacist promotes the right ofself-determination and recognizes individual selfworth by encouraging patients to participate in decisions about their health. A pharmacist communicates with patients in terms that are understandable. In all cases, a pharmacist respects personal and cultural differences among patients.

IV. A pharmacist acts with honesty and integrity in professional relationships.
Interpretation: A pharmacist has a duty to tell the truth and to act with conviction of conscience. A pharmacist avoids discriminatory practices, behavior or work conditions that impair professional judgment, and actions that compromise dedication to the best interests of patients.

V. A pharmacist maintains professional competence.
Interpretation: A pharmacist has a duty to maintain knowledge and abilities as new medications, devices, and technologies become available and as health information advances.

VI. A pharmacist respects the values and abilities of colleagues and other health professionals.
Interpretation: When appropriate, a pharmacist asks for the consultation of colleagues or other health professionals or refers the patient. A pharmacist acknowledges that colleagues and other health professionals may differ in the beliefs and values they apply to the care of the patient.

VII. A pharmacist serves individual, community, and societal needs.
Interpretation: The primary obligation of a pharmacist is to individual patients. However, the obligations of a pharmacist may at times extend beyond the individual to the community and society. In these situations, the pharmacist recognizes the responsibilities that accompany these obligations and acts accordingly.

VIII. A pharmacist seeks justice in the distribution of health resources.
Interpretation: When health resources are allocated, a pharmacist is fair and equitable, balancing the needs of patients and society.

The endorsement of this document was reviewed in 2012 by the Council on Pharmacy Practice and by the Board of Directors and was found to still be appropriate.

Copyright American Pharmacists Association. Adopted by the membership of the American Pharmaceutical Association on October 27, 1994. Endorsed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists House of Delegates on June 3, 1996 (ASHP Policy 9607). Proceedings of the 47th annual session of the ASHP House of Delegates. Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1805. ASHP Reports.

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Course of Study

The entry-level, Doctor of Pharmacy program at St. John’s University is a six-year, 201 credit program. The course of study for this program is detailed here, and is typically published in the University’s Undergraduate Bulletin, under the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.

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Oath of a Pharmacist

The revised Oath was adopted by the AACP House of Delegates in July 2007 and has been approved by the American Pharmacists Association. AACP member institutions should plan to use the revised Oath of a Pharmacist during the 2008-09 academic year and with spring 2009 graduates.

"I promise to devote myself to a lifetime of service to others through the profession of pharmacy. In fulfilling this vow:

  • I will consider the welfare of humanity and relief of suffering my primary concerns.
  • I will apply my knowledge, experience, and skills to the best of my ability to assure optimal outcomes for my patients.
  • I will respect and protect all personal and health information entrusted to me.
  • I will accept the lifelong obligation to improve my professional knowledge and competence.
  • I will hold myself and my colleagues to the highest principles of our profession’s moral, ethical and legal conduct.
  • I will embrace and advocate changes that improve patient care.
  • I will utilize my knowledge, skills, experiences, and values to prepare the next generation of pharmacists.

I take these vows voluntarily with the full realization of the responsibility with which I am entrusted by the public.”

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Doctor of Pharmacy Program Technical Standards

The mission of St. John’s College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences is: “The College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences commits to academic excellence, scholarship and service to humanity through the discovery and application of biomedical knowledge. We facilitate and advance scholarship by offering innovative programs of study utilizing active learning approaches that are student-centered, outcomes oriented and that inspire lifelong learning. As compassionate health care professionals and scientists, we serve humanity through our dedication to excellence in health care and biomedical research. Building on a commitment to cultural diversity and benefiting from our metropolitan location and strategic alliances with leading health care institutions, we strive to serve as effective leaders, good citizens and moral and ethical individuals. We commit ourselves to discovery, communication and application of biomedical knowledge as a critical component for the development of health care professionals and scientists. Through innovative basic, social and clinical research initiatives, we contribute to scientific knowledge, address contemporary health care issues and seek solutions to health care problems. Our mission embodies the principles of the University’s mission statement: to provide a quality education in an environment that is Catholic, Vincentian and metropolitan.”

Doctor of Pharmacy students will be responsible for their own learning with guidance from the faculty, preceptors, administrators and their peers. Students must consistently and accurately demonstrate both academic and technical abilities to ensure minimal competency and adequate progression throughout the curriculum. Technical standards, as distinguished from academic standards, refer to the minimum cognitive, professional and behavioral abilities required for a student to satisfactorily complete of all essential aspects of the curriculum. To successfully progress in and ultimately complete the didactic, laboratory and experiential components of the Doctor of Pharmacy program, students must understand these qualifications. All students will be required to read and sign the following technical standards document to indicate they understand these qualifications. The signed document will be kept as a permanent part of the student’s record.

Cognitive Abilities
Students must possess well-developed critical thinking and clinical problem solving skills. They must be able to integrate, evaluate, analyze, synthesize and apply information gained through measurement, calculation and reasoning. Students must be able to learn in various conditions and environments including the classroom, laboratory, small groups, experiential settings and independent study.

Observation and Motor Skills
Observation necessitates the functional use of visual, auditory and somatic senses. The senses are necessary to observe all aspects of the Doctor of Pharmacy program including but not limited to: demonstrations, lectures, experiments, laboratory activities, patient care activities and other methods of instructional delivery. The student must have sufficient motor skills necessary to prepare all routine forms of medication orders including compounding, administering and dispensing and use of diagnostic equipment, and be able to elicit patient information through the use of palpation, auscultation and other diagnostic maneuvers, and be able to carry out proper emergency procedures. A student must be able to execute motor movements necessary to provide general care and emergency treatment to patients. Students must be able to use computers and other technology necessary for learning and professional practice.

Communication
Students must be able to communicate effectively with colleagues, professors, patients, families and healthcare providers in a timely and accurate manner. Students must be able to read, write, speak and comprehend English with sufficient mastery to accomplish didactic, clinical and laboratory curricular requirements in a timely, high-quality professional and accurate manner.

Behavioral and Social Attributes
Students must demonstrate maturity, integrity, compassion and respect for others. The student must possess the emotional and mental health required for full use of their intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment and to promptly complete all responsibilities pertaining to the practice of pharmacy. The student must have the capability to recognize and show respect for differences in culture, values and ethics among people. The student must be able to demonstrate the ability to handle situations appropriately that may be physically, emotionally or intellectually stressful, and must display appropriate coping responses. The student must appropriately adapt and be able to accept appropriate suggestions and constructive criticism in a mature and acceptable and professional manner. The student must display compassion and concern for others in accordance with the Mission of St. John’s University and the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.

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Pledge of Professionalism

As a student of pharmacy, I believe there is a need to build and reinforce a professional identity founded on integrity, ethical behavior, and honor. This development, a vital process in my education, will help ensure that I am true to the professional relationship I establish between myself and society as I become a member of the pharmacy community. Integrity must be an essential part of my everyday life and I must practice pharmacy with honesty and commitment to service.

To accomplish this goal of professional development, I as a student of pharmacy should:

DEVELOP a sense of loyalty and duty to the profession of pharmacy by being a builder of community, one able and willing to contribute to the well-being of others and one who enthusiastically accepts the responsibility and accountability for membership in the profession.

FOSTER professional competency through life-long learning. I must strive for high ideals, teamwork and unity within the profession in order to provide optimal patient care.

SUPPORT my colleagues by actively encouraging personal commitment to the Oath of Maimonides and a Code of Ethics as set forth by the profession

INCORPORATE into my life and practice, dedication to excellence. This will require an ongoing reassessment of personal and professional values.

MAINTAIN the highest ideals and professional attributes to ensure and facilitate the covenantal relationship required of the pharmaceutical care giver.

The profession of pharmacy is one that demands adherence to a set of rigid ethical standards. These high ideals are necessary to ensure the quality of care extended to the patients I serve. As a student of pharmacy, I believe this does not start with graduation; rather, it begins with my membership in this professional college community. Therefore, I must strive to uphold these standards as I advance toward full membership in the profession of pharmacy.

Developed by the American Pharmaceutical Association Academy of Students of Pharmacy/American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Council of Deans (APhA-ASP/AACP-COD) Task Force

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Policy Regarding the Use of Electronic Devices During Examinations

The recent proliferation of electronic devices amongst college students has presented a dilemma for numerous faculty and administrators in higher education. Although these devices can often be used to enhance the learning environment by providing for a means for communication as well as the rapid retrieval of information, they may also be utilized when such access is inappropriate, such as during examinations and other forms of assessment.

To clarify the college’s position on the unauthorized use of these devices during examinations, exam reviews, quizzes, case studies and other forms of assessment, the following policy has been established:

Policy:

  1. Except when specifically allowed by the course instructor, the use of personal electronic devices should not be used for any purposes during examinations and other forms of assessment.
  2. All electronic devices that can be used to communicate and/or retrieve information, such as but not limited to cell phones, Blackberries, computers, tablets, texting calculators, pagers, camera phones, digital cameras, Apple watches, Google Glasses, and tape recorders, are not to be powered on during an examination and should not be accessed for any purpose.
  3. Students with documented disabilities or exceptional needs, who require electronic devices to complete tests and other forms of assessment, must follow the policies and procedures for “Students with Disabilities” as outlined in the University Student Handbook.
  4. In addition to the restrictions above, faculty may specify for their course what types of calculators may be used during examinations (tests, quizzes, final exams, etc.)
  5. Any student found to be using an electronic device as described above during an examination or other form of assessment shall be considered in violation of St. John’s University’s Academic Honor pledge and may be subject to the Academic Disciplinary process for such violation as outlined in the University’s Student Handbook
  6. For the purposes of the Academic Disciplinary process, it is the responsibility of any student found using an unauthorized electronic device to demonstrate that use of such a device was not for the purpose of cheating.

The College recognizes that there are instances when students face personal emergencies and may need venues to receive pertinent information while they are attending class or taking an examination. In the event an individual faces an urgent situation, he/she should notify their faculty member and discuss options prior to the examination.

Faculty continue to control their classroom and testing environment and have the final say in what electronic devices may or may not be used and in what manner they may be used in their classroom and during examinations.

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Program Mission and Vision

Mission
The Doctor of Pharmacy Program prepares graduates to serve as medication experts who have the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to promote and deliver outstanding patient-centered care in all contemporary pharmacy practice settings with a global perspective. Graduates will be effective leaders, dedicated scholars and moral and ethical practitioners within interprofessional healthcare teams.

Vision
The Doctor of Pharmacy program will attain a level of global distinction, preparing our graduates to serve the needs of patients, the profession and healthcare system, and instilling a commitment to cultural sensitivity and the underserved in urban environments.

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Educational Philosophy

We develop our graduates into compassionate, caring, competent members of the healthcare team by providing strong foundational knowledge in the basic and biomedical sciences through abilities-based instruction that adequately prepares our graduates for a career in professional pharmacy practice. Our students participate in academic service-learning opportunities early and often in our curriculum to demonstrate the benefits of pharmacist-provided patient care in an urban, culturally diverse, underserved patient population in keeping with our Vincentian mission and in accordance with the University’s commitment to global education. Our distinguished faculty share their knowledge and experiences using a variety of teaching methods suitable for students with different learning styles. Our programmatic goals and objectives are met using a diverse mix of classroom, laboratory and abilities-based learning exercises. Lectures, group projects, active learning, simulation exercises, and real-world experiences combine to provide students an opportunity to grow into independent practitioners ready to participate as members of the interprofessional healthcare team. Our graduates are equipped with the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to be healthcare providers and lifelong learners who are adaptable to an ever-changing local and global healthcare environment.

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Student Progression Policy – Doctor of Pharmacy Program

Policy
All students in the Doctor of Pharmacy Program are expected to make adequate progress through the program. Students who encounter difficulties as a result of academic or personal challenges that slow/limit progression in the program will be referred to the Ad-Hoc Progression Committee for review regardless of the student’s cumulative and math/science/professional grade point average. Students who fail the Pharm. D. Competency Examination exam remediation process will also be referred to this committee for review.

Procedure
At the end of each academic year, all pharmacy students will be evaluated by the Associate Dean for Pharmacy Programs to assess their progression in the program. Students whose deficiency is six credits or more at the end of the academic year will be referred to the Committee for action. Progression will only consider courses that are applicable to the major. Minor or personal interest courses will be excluded.

  1. The progress of students identified who not meet the above stated criteria will be reviewed by the students’ advisor and a course deficiency report will generated with a proposed program of study that will allow the student to attain appropriate progression.
  2. The student deficiency reports will be reviewed by the College’s Ad-Hoc Pharmacy Progression Committee who will approve an appropriate academic plan for each student. This plan will be reviewed by and agreed to by the student.
  3. The student’s advisor will provide periodic updates to the Committee concerning the student’s progress and the Committee will provide recommendations on a semester by semester basis to the student.
  4. Failure to adhere to/ or complete the prescribed plan in the designated timeframe may result in the student’s dismissal from the program. Such a decision would be made by the Dean of the College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions after a review of the Committee’s recommendation and in consultation with the Assistant Dean for Pharmacy Student Affairs and the Associate Dean for Pharmacy Programs
  5. The Committee’s composition will be appointed from the members of the full-time faculty of the College’s three Departments who teach in the pharmacy program and in consultation with the Department chairs.

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The recent proliferation of electronic devices amongst college students has presented a dilemma for numerous faculty and administrators in higher education. Although these devices can often be used to enhance the learning environment by providing for a means for communication as well as the rapid retrieval of information, they may also be utilized when such access is inappropriate, such as during examinations and other forms of assessment.

To clarify the college’s position on the unauthorized use of these devices during examinations, exam reviews, quizzes, case studies and other forms of assessment, the following policy has been established:

Policy

  1. Except when specifically allowed by the course instructor, the use of personal electronic devices should not be used for any purposes during examinations and other forms of assessment.
     
  2. All electronic devices that can be used to communicate and/or retrieve information, such as but not limited to cell phones, Blackberries, computers, tablets, texting calculators, pagers, camera phones, digital cameras, Apple watches, Google Glasses, and tape recorders, are not to be powered on during an examination and should not be accessed for any purpose.
     
  3. Students with documented disabilities or exceptional needs, who require electronic devices to complete tests and other forms of assessment, must follow the policies and procedures for “Students with Disabilities” as outlined in the University Student Handbook.
     
  4. In addition to the restrictions above, faculty may specify for their course what types of calculators may be used during examinations (tests, quizzes, final exams, etc.)
     
  5. Any student found to be using an electronic device as described above during an examination or other form of assessment shall be considered in violation of St. John’s University’s Academic Honor pledge and may be subject to the Academic Disciplinary process for such violation as outlined in the University’s Student Handbook.
     
  6. For the purposes of the Academic Disciplinary process, it is the responsibility of any student found using an unauthorized electronic device to demonstrate that use of such a device was not for the purpose of cheating.

The College recognizes that there are instances when students face personal emergencies and may need venues to receive pertinent information while they are attending class or taking an examination. In the event an individual faces an urgent situation, he/she should notify their faculty member and discuss options prior to the examination.

Faculty continue to control their classroom and testing environment and have the final say in what electronic devices may or may not be used and in what manner they may be used in their classroom and during examinations.

Health-Sciences Specific Documents

All students accepted into the health sciences programs including physician assistant, radiologic sciences, and clinical laboratory sciences attend a portion of their curriculum at the Dr. Andrew J. Bartilicci Center and clinical rotation sites as assigned. During this component of their training students who qualify for progression receive guidelines specific to the respective programs delineating student, faculty, and preceptor responsibilities for the didactic and clinical years of program attendance and clinical training.

The College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences is accreditated by many professional agencies: View the full list of agencies.

The St. John’s University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences offers  two-year post Pharm. D. fellowship training programs designed to train the Doctor of Pharmacy graduate in specific parctice areas of the pharmaceutical industry.

The recent proliferation of electronic devices amongst college students has presented a dilemma for numerous faculty and administrators in higher education. Although these devices can often be used to enhance the learning environment by providing for a means for communication as well as the rapid retrieval of information, they may also be utilized when such access is inappropriate, such as during examinations and other forms of assessment.

To clarify the college’s position on the unauthorized use of these devices during examinations, exam reviews, quizzes, case studies and other forms of assessment, the following policy has been established:

Policy

  1. Except when specifically allowed by the course instructor, the use of personal electronic devices should not be used for any purposes during examinations and other forms of assessment.
     
  2. All electronic devices that can be used to communicate and/or retrieve information, such as but not limited to cell phones, Blackberries, computers, tablets, texting calculators, pagers, camera phones, digital cameras, Apple watches, Google Glasses, and tape recorders, are not to be powered on during an examination and should not be accessed for any purpose.
     
  3. Students with documented disabilities or exceptional needs, who require electronic devices to complete tests and other forms of assessment, must follow the policies and procedures for “Students with Disabilities” as outlined in the University Student Handbook.
     
  4. In addition to the restrictions above, faculty may specify for their course what types of calculators may be used during examinations (tests, quizzes, final exams, etc.)
     
  5. Any student found to be using an electronic device as described above during an examination or other form of assessment shall be considered in violation of St. John’s University’s Academic Honor pledge and may be subject to the Academic Disciplinary process for such violation as outlined in the University’s Student Handbook.
     
  6. For the purposes of the Academic Disciplinary process, it is the responsibility of any student found using an unauthorized electronic device to demonstrate that use of such a device was not for the purpose of cheating.

The College recognizes that there are instances when students face personal emergencies and may need venues to receive pertinent information while they are attending class or taking an examination. In the event an individual faces an urgent situation, he/she should notify their faculty member and discuss options prior to the examination.

Faculty continue to control their classroom and testing environment and have the final say in what electronic devices may or may not be used and in what manner they may be used in their classroom and during examinations.