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Sociology, Master of Arts

Sociology and Anthropology
33 Credits

St. John's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Queens Campus

Overview

Sociology is the study of social life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Sociologists understand social inequality, patterns of behavior, forces for social change and resistance, and how social systems work. The field also offers a range of research techniques that can be applied to virtually any aspect of social life, including: street crime and policing practices; disparities in income and family resources; poverty and unemployment; problems of peace and war; the forces that lead to globalization and its consequences for groups and communities around the world. Because sociologists address the most challenging issues of our time, it is an exciting discipline with expanding opportunities for a wide range of career paths.

The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Sociology at St. John’s University fosters the development of critical thinking, analytical, and research skills alongside an understanding of sociological theory and urban and global perspectives. Our course offerings reflect the breadth of areas of specialization within the discipline. Our program emphasizes the study of racial, class, and gender inequality; community and urban development; and globalization and social movements, allowing you to choose a general course of study that fits your interests and career goals. Moreover, our program offers you the possibility of choosing a concentration in either The Global City and Social Justice or Confronting Inequalities, or to develop a master’s thesis project, to help you get the most out of your graduate study. 

The program also offers a one-year hybrid applied option that will allow you to gain hands-on experience with learned concepts and skills, while increasing affordability. 

Department Faculty

Please see a list of our Sociology and Anthropology faculty.

Contact

Roberta Villalon, Ph.D.
Professor and Chair
St. John Hall, Room 444L 
718-990-5663 
[email protected]

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Admission

Eligible students possess a baccalaureate degree with an overall GPA of 3.0 and 18 undergraduate credits in sociology or a related social science. International students must submit TOEFL or IELTS scores. 

Competitive assistantships are available for qualified full-time students. Please visit Graduate Assistantships and Fellowships for more information. 

Office of Graduate Admission
718-990-1601
[email protected]

Courses

Based on the expertise of our faculty and the professional needs of our students, our program offers the following options to complete the M.A. The non-thesis options may be completed as a one-year hybrid applied program.

Thesis Option

15-credit core
Nine credits of elective courses
Six credits of SOC 900 Master’s Research

Non-Thesis Option – General

15-credit core
18 credits of elective courses
Comprehensive Examination

Non-Thesis Option – The Global City and Social Justice

15-credit core
12 credits of elective courses within the concentration
Six credits of general elective courses
Comprehensive Examination

Non-Thesis Option – Confronting Inequalities

15-credit core
12 credits of elective courses within the concentration
Six credits of general elective courses
Comprehensive Examination

The required core courses are:

  • SOC 127; 127L Statistics for Social Science (Pre-requisite for SOC 300)
  • SOC 210 Sociological Theory: Classical
  • SOC 212 Sociological Theory: Contemporary
  • SOC 300 Social Research: Strategies and Tactics (Pre-requisite for SOC 301)
  • SOC 301; 301L Evaluation Research & Data Analysis

Elective courses include:

  • CRM 122 Drugs and Society
  • SOC 107 Social Deviance
  • SOC 115 Sociology of Gender
  • SOC 117 Family Violence
  • SOC 120 Race and Ethnicity
  • SOC 121 Sociology of the Family
  • SOC 131 Sociology of Youth
  • SOC 170 Social Psychology
  • SOC 200 Sociology of Latino/as in the US
  • SOC 201 Economic Sociology
  • SOC 207 Sociology of Work
  • SOC 208 Cultural Studies
  • SOC 209 Human Trafficking – Contemporary Slavery
  • SOC 217 Gender in a Global Context
  • SOC 218 Immigration and Inequality
  • SOC 220 Social Construction of Race in the US
  • SOC 221 Sociology of News Media
  • SOC 223 Urban Sociology
  • SOC 228 Sociology of Community
  • SOC 234 Global Poverty
  • SOC 236 Sociology of Poverty
  • SOC 242 Political Sociology
  • SOC 243 Social Movements and Social Change
  • SOC 244 Social Movements and Globalization
  • SOC 245 GIS Applications for Global Development and Social Justice

Courses that apply to The Global City and Social Justice concentration are:

  • SOC 217 Gender in a Global Context
  • SOC 222 Sociology of the Global City
  • SOC 223 Urban Sociology
  • SOC 224 Women and The City
  • SOC 228 Sociology of Community
  • SOC 234 Global Poverty
  • SOC 235 Global Inequality
  • SOC 244 Social Movements and Globalization
  • SOC 260 Inequality and Oppression

Courses that apply to the Confronting Inequalities concentration are:

  • CRM 133 Class, Race, and Criminal Justice
  • CRM 234 Women and Crime
  • SOC 115 Sociology of Gender
  • SOC 120 Race and Ethnicity
  • SOC 217 Gender in a Global Context
  • SOC 218 Immigration and Inequality
  • SOC 220 Social Construction of Race in the US
  • SOC 234 Global Poverty
  • SOC 235 Global Inequality
  • SOC 236 Sociology of Poverty
  • SOC 243 Social Movements and Social Change
  • SOC 244 Social Movements and Globalization
  • SOC 246 Political Sociology
  • SOC 260 Inequality and Oppression

Other courses may be counted for each one of the concentrations with prior approval of the department chair.  Students interested in the thesis option must obtain chair’s approval.  

Career Outcomes

Graduates from this program have found jobs that allow them to apply their methodological, statistical, and theoretical sociological knowledge. Most graduates work on research-related and service positions in government, public offices, nonprofit organizations, and private institutions, as well as education. In most cases, graduates are devoted to working for underprivileged populations as well as collaborating in the design of public policies and social programs addressing social inequalities. Some M.A. graduates continue with their education by pursuing a doctoral degree in sociology. If you are already working in a related career field, the M.A. degree can help you advance your position or gain a salary increase. Overall, graduates with an M.A. in Sociology report high job satisfaction because of their ability to apply learned skills to their positions and interest in their jobs.

All professionals gain an edge from being able to research and analyze information, and graduates holding an M.A. in Sociology are well-equipped to answer the demand for these skills. Our program at St. John’s is specifically geared toward preparing you for a career in the following diverse fields:

  • Public Relations
  • Social Service Agencies
  • Family Service Agencies
  • Federal Investigation
  • Higher Education Administration
  • Human Resources
  • Advertising
  • Parole/Probation
  • U.S. Customs
  • Research Analysis
  • Program Evaluation

The program will also prepare you for further study in law, sociology, and social work. Many of our graduates have gone on to pursue doctoral and law degrees at institutions such as Columbia University, Rutgers University, the University of Illinois, the University of California-Berkeley, and the University of Connecticut, among others.

Additional Information

For additional information about our program and the field of sociology, please contact the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, St. John Hall, Room 444D, 718-990-6296 or 718-990-5667. You may also visit the websites of the American Sociological Association  and the International Sociological Association