Graduate Student in Library

Library and Information Science, Master of Science

Library and Information Science

Overview

The Master of Science (M.S.) program in Library and Information Science at St. John’s University will provide you with the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in today’s information-rich workplace. Our graduates demonstrate leadership in facilitating the information needs of a variety of patrons and clients, and are prepared for such diverse settings as public libraries, government and corporate information centers, archives, law firms, museums, and more. 

ALA Accreditation Seal

Our program is accredited by the American Library Association (ALA) Committee on Accreditation with the status of Continued Accreditation. Our next comprehensive review visit is scheduled for 2018. The program is also guided by the Vincentian Mission of St. John’s, which emphasizes service and social justice. All academic programs at St. John’s emphasize the integration of the liberal arts and focus on ethical decision-making based in Catholic social teaching.

To ensure student success and accommodate full-time professionals pursuing the M.S. degree, we offer a fully online program. The program requires 36 credits, four core courses, a management course, and seven elective courses. You’ll also submit an electronic portfolio as an end of program assessment, which will allow you to showcase your graduate work to potential employers in the future.

Department Faculty

Please see a list of our Library and Information Science faculty at St. John's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Department Contact

James Vorbach, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Director, Library and Information Science
St. Augustine Hall, Room 408A
718-990-1834
[email protected]

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Admission

All applicants to the program must possess a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university with a 3.0 grade point average or above. The Division of Library and Information Science reviews applications on a rolling basis throughout the year.

Additional application requirements include:

  • A statement of professional purpose, which should include a meaningful discussion of what you hope to accomplish with an M.S. in Library and Information Science from St. John's.
  • Two letters of recommendation from professors, instructors, or persons with whom you have worked in a professional capacity.  
  • Official transcripts from each institution you have attended. 
  • A $70 non-refundable application fee.
  • An interview with the program director may be required. 

Office of Graduate Admission
718-990-1601
[email protected]

Courses

The 36-credit Master of Science program requires the completion of the following three-credit core courses:

LIS 203 Information Organization
LIS 204 Introduction to Library and Information Science
LIS 205 Information Sources and Services
LIS 239 Research and Evaluation Methods

Based on your area of specialization, you are also required to complete one of the following three-credit management courses:

LIS 240 Management of Libraries and Information Centers
LIS 243 Law Library Administration

You’ll also choose seven three-credit elective courses, in consultation with a program advisor. Specializations and advisors are listed below.

The Academic Librarianship specialization will prepare you for a career as an information specialist in academic environments, including community and junior colleges, four-year liberal arts colleges or technical institutes, colleges and universities with select graduate programs, and large-scale public and private research universities. For more information, please contact Kevin Rioux, Ph.D., at [email protected].

Recommended courses include:

  • LIS 221 Planning and Delivering Information Literacy Programs
  • LIS 231 College and University Libraries
  • LIS 238 Web Design for Libraries and Information Centers
  • LIS 260 Information Use and Users

The archival studies specialization will train you to select, arrange, and preserve records of enduring value to researchers. You’ll develop principles of sound management to ensure the long-term preservation of collections. For more information, please contact Christine Angel, Ph.D., at [email protected] or Kristin Szylvian, Ph.D., at [email protected].

Recommended courses include:

  • LIS 230 Introduction to Digital Libraries
  • LIS 238 Web Design for Libraries and Information Centers
  • LIS 245 Special Collections Librarianship and History of the Book: Principles and Practices
  • LIS 249 Archives and Records Management
  • LIS 253 Oral History
  • LIS 257 Archival Representation
  • LIS 258 Museum Informatics
  • LIS 269 Internship
  • LIS 302 Genealogical Sources and Services

Law librarians contribute to the fast-paced legal field by meeting the ever-increasing demand for information management and access. Though some law librarians hold J.D. degrees, with your M.S. degree from St. John’s, you’ll be well qualified for work in academic law libraries, state and county public law libraries, court houses, government agencies, corporate legal departments, private law firms, and other legal information centers. For more information, please contact Ralph Monaco at [email protected].

Recommended courses include:

  • LIS 243 Law Library Administration
  • LIS 254 Legal Research
  • LIS 255 Advanced Legal Research
  • LIS 269 Internship
  • LIS 282 Knowledge Management

As a public librarian, you’ll provide highly-specialized assistance to users in large or small populations. You’ll serve all ages and types of patrons and manage relationships with community organizations and schools. In the M.S. program, you’ll develop the knowledge and skills necessary to run a public library, including: reference, programming, collection development, administration, technical services, outreach/advocacy, and user services for both youth and adults. For more information, please contact Kevin Rioux, Ph.D., at [email protected] or Shari Lee, Ph.D., at [email protected].

Recommended courses include:

  • LIS 221 Planning and Delivering Information Literacy Programs
  • LIS 222 Materials and Services to Diverse Populations
  • LIS 233 Public Libraries and Community Information Centers
  • LIS 238 Web Design
  • LIS 260 Information Use and Users
  • LIS 302 Genealogical Sources and Services

Special librarians are information resource experts dedicated to putting knowledge to work to attain the goals of their organizations. Their position titles are as varied as the environments in which these information professionals are employed. Today's special librarians do far more than locate and collect data for their clients. Using current technologies, they also evaluate, analyze, organize, package, and present information in a way that maximizes its usefulness. For more information, please contact James Vorbach, Ph.D., at [email protected].

Recommended courses include:

  • LIS 221 Planning and Delivering Information Literacy Programs
  • LIS 232 Special Libraries and Information Centers
  • LIS 237 Metadata
  • LIS 245 Special Collections Librarianship and History of the Book: Principles and Practices
  • LIS 248 Database Modeling and Design
  • LIS 260 Information Use and Users
  • LIS 282 Knowledge Management

The youth services specialization will prepare you for a position as a children's or young adult librarian, a library coordinator in a public library, a youth specialist on a regional or state level, or a collection development librarian specializing in youth materials. For more information, please contact Shari Lee, Ph.D., at [email protected].

Recommended courses include:

  • LIS 121 Literature and Related Resources for Children
  • LIS 125 Library Materials and Services for Young Children
  • LIS 126 Literature and Related Resources for Young Adults
  • LIS 127 Library Services for Children and Young Adults
  • LIS 213 Popular Culture and the Young Adult

Career Outcomes

The rapid transformation fueled by technological innovation and ever-evolving societal expectations for information are creating new opportunities for information professionals. The M.S. in Library and Information Science at St. John’s prepares you for emerging job opportunities in a variety of traditional and non-traditional settings:

Archives, museums, and record centersCorporate, business, and legal organizations
Government and non-governmental (NGO) organizationsHealth, medical, pharmaceutical, and scientific institutions
Non-profit organizationsPost-secondary institutions
Public librariesSpecial libraries

In our commitment to prepare you for the evolving workforce, the program will help you develop and hone your expertise and abilities in some of the most sought-after job skills involving communication, knowledge management, collaboration, advocacy, research, and project management.


Some examples of positions include:

ArchivistBusiness LibrarianCommunications SpecialistConflicts Analyst
Digital Initiatives Program ManagerInformation Technology SpecialistInnovation LibrarianInstructional and Training Librarian
Knowledge ConsultantLinked Data StrategistMedical LibrarianProject Manager
Research AnalystResearch LibrarianSpecial Collections LibrarianWorkflow Analyst

While enrolled in the program, you’ll be able to gain real-world experience through an internship, which most employers look for on an applicant’s resume. St. John’s maintains relationships with host sites throughout New York City and beyond to help you find an internship placement that suits your unique interests and career goals.

To help you start your career and succeed, we offer resume, cover letter, and interview webinars through University Career Services. Our department also notifies current students and alumni regularly of internship and job opportunities in the field through our blog.

Online Learning

Earn Your Degree Online

Pursue your St. John’s M.S. in Library and Information Science degree entirely on your computer. Our fully accredited Online Learning programs allow you to take courses electronically. Log in at your convenience to enter our virtual classrooms, learn from our accomplished faculty, and engage with classmates.

Our online courses offer the same high academic quality that students experience on campus. Professors deliver lectures and post assignments via Blackboard, our electronic course management system. Students use it to attend virtual classes, share documents, take exams, and exchange ideas with faculty and classmates.

A Fully Academic Experience

You also enjoy the outstanding services available to all St. John’s students, for example:

  • Eligibility for scholarships and financial aid
  • Tuition and fees identical to those for on-campus courses
  • Access to library collections, career services, mentoring, and other academic resources.

Click here for more information about the Online M.S. in Library and Information Science at St. John’s.

Student Outcomes Data

Retention

Students Entering 

Returned

Retention Value

Fall 2016

Fall 2017

83%

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

92%

Graduation Rates (Three-Year)

Students Entering

Graduated In

Rate

Fall 2015

2018

83%

Fall 2014

2017

68%

Fall 2013

2016

88%

Career Outcomes Data

Year

Population

Response Rate

Placement Rate

2018

22

66.7%

85.7%

2017

30

59.3%

93.8%

2016

22

60.7%

100.0%

 

 

Tuition and Financial Aid

You may apply for graduate assistantships throughout the University. These positions offer tuition remission and, typically, a stipend. You can find more information about graduate assistantships on the Graduate Assistantships and Fellowships page.

The Division of Library and Information Science offers the Rev. Brian J. O’Connell, C.M. Scholarship, named after the late Dean of St. John’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, to high-achieving applicants who earn GPAs of 3.4 or higher (on a 4.0 scale) for their most recent degrees. Incoming students do not need to apply separately for this scholarship, but are automatically granted partial tuition reprieve based on academic merit.

Named after a former faculty member and alumnus, the Garino scholarship is awarded to an academically distinguished Library and Information Science master's student who has demonstrated proficiency in Library and Information Science-related technologies. The $5,000 award is reserved for currently-enrolled students register for 12 or more credits within the Division. 

The Hyland scholarship is awarded to an academically distinguished applicant enrolled in either the Archival Studies specialization or the Advanced Certificate in Management for Information Professionals. The scholarship, which provides full tuition for one three-credit course in Library and Information Science to a a newly-accepted student, is awarded to master's students entering the program in the fall semester.

Named after a former director of the Division of Library and Information Science, the Lowe scholarship is awarded to a student at risk of leaving the program due to personal hardship. It provides full tuition for one three-credit course, and requires applicants to submit a brief statement documenting the hardship endangering their enrollment. 

The Minutaglia scholarship provides full tuition for one three-credit course to an academically distinguished student entering the program who has expressed interest in public librarianship. 

Other scholarship opportunities include the H.W. Wilson Foundation Scholarship. For more information about scholarships and tuition, please visit Tuition and Financial Aid.

Please note that California residents in online programs at out of state nonprofit institutions, like St. John’s University are ineligible for all forms of federal aid, including federal student loans based on current federal state authorization rules.

Additional Information

At St. John’s, we encourage you to pursue professional and academic development opportunities that enrich your degree. The following Library and Information Science resources will enhance both your resume and your experience of the program.

Gain valuable real-world experience with an internship at one of the many libraries and information centers in New York City and beyond that partner with St. John’s.

Our division’s symposia explore current issues and trends in library and information science as well as other topics of interest. They feature presentations from current students, alumni, members of the faculty, and prominent outside speakers.

The Special Libraries Association (SLA) of St. John's University exists to support the needs of our library science students, promote the study of alternative information occupations, and encourage active membership in the SLA.

The American Library Association/New York Library Association Student Chapter at St. John’s University provides networking opportunities and learning experiences afforded by membership to these professional organizations. 

Academic Service-Learning (AS-L) allows you to combine program learning goals and community service through opportunities at libraries, archives, museums, and related non-profits.