Interdisciplinary Minors

We offer the following interdisciplinary minors for students who wish to complement their major areas of study or focus their core requirements and general electives in particular directions. 

Interdisciplinary Minors

The minor in Africana Studies requires 15 credits including HIS 3400 African Civilizations and the African Diaspora and four of the following:

ANT 2440 Caribbean Cultures and Identities
ANT 2450 African Cultures
ART 1755 Art of Africa
ART 1830 Racism in Film
ENG 3300 Colonial American Literature
ENG 3330 African-American Literature to 1900
ENG 3470 20th-Century African-American Literature
ENG 3475 African-American Women’s Rhetorics
ENG 3480 The Harlem Renaissance
ENG 3650 Caribbean Literature
FRE 3820 French Afro-Caribbean Literature
GOV 2480 Municipal Government and Administration
GOV 2750 Politics of the Caribbean Area
GOV 3680 Politics of Africa
HIS 2300 History of Africa
HIS 2301 Africa in the Colonial Period
HIS 2302 Contemporary Africa
HIS 2334 A History of the Atlantic World, 1492-1888
HIS 2450 History of the Modern Caribbean
HIS 3410 African Nationalism
HIS 3711 African-American History to 1900
HIS 3712 African-American History since 1900
HIS 3850 Africa and the Atlantic
MUS 1300 History of Jazz
PSY 2230 Psychology of the African-American Experience
SOC 1190 Sociology of Poverty in America
SOC 2450 Sociology of the Black Experience

For more information, contact Africana Studies Program Co-Directors Dr. Robert Bland or Dr. Philip Misevich at [email protected].

American Studies faculty are drawn from eleven academic disciplines — Communication Science Disorders, English, Environmental Studies, Fine Arts, History, Geography, Government, Music, Philosophy, Rhetoric/Communication/Theater, and Theology. This range of disciplines gives the American Studies minor unparalleled flexibility and versatility. Chances are you are already taking courses in American Studies! In addition, American Studies minors choose a course in their senior year that develops and maximizes their problem-solving skills in real world settings.    

American Studies, the first and most well-established interdisciplinary field in the United States, is recognized as a vital component of vocational preparation for students considering careers in government, administration, public policy, business, and education, management, and law.         

The American Studies interdisciplinary minor consists of 18 credits, with distribution requirements in three disciplinary groupings. Fifteen credits are taken from courses listed below, in addition to a three-credit capstone seminar.

The American Studies interdisciplinary minor consist of 18 credits, with distribution requirements in three disciplinary groupings, in keeping with the interdisciplinary nature of the field. 15 credits are taken from courses listed under these three groupings:  Humanities; Social Sciences; and Art and Popular Culture. Students take 6 credits in courses listed under the Humanities; 6 credits in courses listed under Social Sciences; and 3 credits in courses listed in Art and Popular Culture. The remaining 3 credit requirement is satisfied in one of three ways:  by taking another American Studies course; by taking an internship in a discipline of American Studies; or by taking any course, except one within the Institute for Core Studies, with an Academic Service Learning component. This last option is subject to the approval of your academic advisor and the program director (pending approval by the Liberal Arts Faculty Council).

Humanities (6 credits; no more than 3 credits to be taken in any one discipline):
ENG 2060:Studies in American Literature
ENG 3300:Colonial American Literature
ENG 3310:Antebellum American Literature
ENG 3320:19th Century American Fiction
ENG 3330:African American Literature to 1900
ENG 3340:American Realism and Naturalism
ENG 3350:American Women Writers
ENG 3360:Early National American Literature
ENG 3390:Special Topics in American Literature to 1900
ENG 3470:20th Century African-American Literature
ENG 3480:The Harlem Renaissance
ENG 3560:American Ethnic Literature
  
HIS/GEO 1002*:North American Geography
HIS 2700: U.S.:Colonial America
HIS 2710: US.: The Early National Period
HIS 2711: U.S.:The Revolutionary Age
HIS 2712: U.S.:Jeffersonian and Jacksonian Periods
HIS 2720: U.S.:Civil War and Reconstruction
HIS 2730: U.S.:The Gilded Age
HIS 2740: U.S.: The Age of Reform
HIS 2750: U.S.:World War II and Post-War America
HIS 3100/ ASC 2540: America Meets China
HIS 3150:History of Inter-American Relations
HIS 3180: America and the Muslim World
HIS 3375:Asian-American History
HIS 3701:U.S. Foreign Relations
HIS 3702:U.S. Foreign Relations
HIS 3705: Race Relations in American Foreoign Policy
HIS 3711:African-American History to 1900
HIS 3712:African-American History Since 1900
HIS 3715: History of Race and Ethnicity in the United States
HIS 3720:Indians and Europeans in Early America
HIS 3725:Law in American History
HIS 3731:Women and Gender in Early America: from Settlement to the Civil War
HIS 3732:Women and Gender in Modern America: Civil War to the Present
HIS 3735:Women and Social Movements in U.S. History
HIS 3740:U.S.: Urban America
HIS 3750: The American South from Reconstruction to the Present
HIS 3760:History of New York City and Long Island
HIS 3780:Immigrants and the Catholic Church in the U.S.
HIS 3790:The Military in American History
HIS 3795:Technology and Science in 20th Century America
PHI 3540:American Philosophy
RCT 2040:American Public Address
THE 3510:Religion in the United States
  
Social Sciences (6 credits; no more than 3 credits to be taken in any one subject):  
CSD 1710*:Phonetics
GOV 1350*:The American Experience
GOV 2160/ ESP 2160: American Environmental Politics and Policies
GOV 2240:Federalist Papers
GOV 2430:American Presidency
GOV 2510:American Political Parties and Interest Groups
GOV 2641:Foreign Policy of the United States
GOV 3330: American Political Thought of the 19th and 20th Centuries
GOV 3590:American Government and Business Relations
GOV 3800:American Econopolitics
  
SOC 1170:Inequality: Race, Class and Gender
SOC 1190: Sociology of Poverty in America
SOC 2410:Race and Ethnicity in America
SOC 2440:Gender Identity in Popular Culture
SOC 2450:Sociology of the Black Experience
SOC 2420:Immigration and Inequality
SOC/ANT 2750: The North American Indian
  
Art and Popular Culture (3 credits):   
ART 1830:Racism in Film
ART 1840:Sexism in Cinema and Television
ART 2790:Contemporary Art and Culture, 1945-present
  
MUS 1230:History of American Popular Music
MUS 1260:American Musical Theater
MUS 1300:History of Jazz

*Pending approval by the Liberal Arts Faculty Council

Career Options
A minor in American Studies gives St. John’s students essential preparation for career occupational sectors that have some of the strongest growth in the United States. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, these sectors include administration, management, public relations, market research, law and education.1  Each of these careers demands a high level of critical thinking, writing skills and experience in research. American Studies courses helps students meet this demand with a curriculum focused on the academic skills that employers require.  

Because an American Studies minor focuses students on the study of the United States, past and present, they are uniquely prepared to master still another skill that for-profit and corporate employers need from new employees: the ability to communicate, work with, understand and serve a diverse population.2 With its range of courses that embrace the full array of cultures in the United States, American Studies offers St. John’s students an education in diversity that no graduate should be without.

An American Studies minor is a vital component of St. John’s pre-law curriculum and a traditional launching pad for law school students. Law schools and firms want students to have the breadth of liberal arts knowledge that the minor provides. Because the courses in American Studies also address social problems and challenges that face the United States today, students are also well prepared for careers in wide range of community services, from arts and culture to public health and social work.

For students seeking careers in government, public policy and urban planning, a minor in American Studies is a perfect stepping stone. It gives students the opportunities to expand their knowledge of government and policy in the United States with courses in American literature, history, philosophy, theology and culture. The grounding in civic education that students receive with an American Studies is yet another important priority named by prospective employers of new college students.

An American Studies minor brings the best of the humanities together with the real world impact of the social sciences. As a result, it is specially suited for the St. John’s student looking to make a difference and extend their commitment to the St. John’s Vincentian mission by making a career out of serving the less fortunate. American Studies is perfect preparation for careers in non-profit management, economic development and social advocacy.

For assistance planning the transition from a minor in American Studies to a career, contact the Career Center or Dr. Fanuzzi.

1 See the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics’ “Career Guide to Industries” http://www.bls.gov/oco/cg/
2 For more information, see the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ Project LEAP report, “The Essential Learning Outcomes.” http://www.aacu.org/leap/documents/EssentialOutcomes_Chart.pdf

More Information
Robert Fanuzzi
Program Director
718-390-4416
[email protected]

The Catholic Studies minor requires students to complete 18 credits including:

THE 1000C Perspectives on Christianity: A Catholic Approach
THE 2000 The Catholic Imagination
THE 3000 Global Catholicism

Students also take three additional Theology and Religious Studies courses, approved by the minor director, and two electives outside of the department, with permission of the director. For more information, contact Dr. Matthew Sutton, [email protected].

The Global Studies interdisciplinary minor consists of 18 credits, distributed among core requirements, a capstone seminar, and three free electives in the student’s chosen area of specialization. Students in the minor are required to study abroad.

Core Courses (six credits)

Cultural Studies: History, Literature, Religion (three credits)
ANT 1050 World Cultures: Yesterday and Today
ENG 3520 Modern World Literature
HIS 1010 World History I
THE 2810 Introduction to World Religions
Students may also take any 2000-level or higher language course to satisfy this requirement.

Political Studies (three credits)
GOV 1610 International Relations
GOV 3620 International Law
GOV 3670 International Political Economy
PHI 3660 Political Philosophy

Capstone Course (three credits)

A multidisciplinary approach to global challenges, from the perspective of government and politics, history, geography, economics, anthropology, literary studies, and theology and religious studies. Students consider regional and international conflict, global finance, environmental degradation, global poverty, conflicts between competing religious and political ideologies, and international diplomacy and systems of communication within the context of international political economics, international law, and cultural studies. The course focuses on a number of theoretical approaches to historical and contemporary crisis, which can be understood using the global framework.

Free Electives (nine credits)

Students choose three courses in one of the following four Generalist Tracks or the Specialist Track. For the Specialist Track, students may pursue nine credits in a particular region or area of study, not limited to the courses listed below, with approval of the program director.

Culture and Society
ENG 3520 Modern World Literature
ENG 3580 Postcolonial Literature
GOV 3620 International Law
GOV 3200 Political Image through Literature
HIS 2300 History of Africa
HIS 2301 Africa in the Colonial Period
HIS 2302 Contemporary Africa
HIS 2310 History of Asia
HIS 2311 History of East Asia
HIS 2312 History of Modern East Asia
HIS 2320 The Middle East
HIS 2321 History of Islamic Society
HIS 2330; 2331; 2332 History of Latin America; I; II
HIS 2450 History of the Modern Caribbean
HIS 2540 Europe and the 20th -Century World
HIS 2542 Europe from World War II to the Present
HIS 3100 America Meets China
HIS 3120 The History of Racism in the West Since 1500
HIS 3130 Personalities in History
HIS 3150 History of Inter-American Relations
HIS 3160 History of Human Rights
HIS 3180 America and the Muslim World
HIS 3340 Asian Pacific Diasporas in Modern History
HIS 3360 The History of Modern China
HIS 3370 Modern Wars in Asia
HIS 3400 African Civilizations and the Africa Diaspora
HIS 3501; 3502 Diplomatic History of Europe I; II
HIS 3653 The History of the Soviet Union and the Successor States
HIS 3660 Russia as a Multinational Empire
HIS 3702 U.S. Foreign Relations, 1945 to the Present
HIS 3580 Wars of Empire
HIS 3850 Africa and the Atlantic
PHI 3520 History of Modern Philosophy
PHI 3530 History of Contemporary Philosophy
PHI 3660 Political Philosophy
PHI 3670 Modernity in Crisis
PHI 3680 Philosophical Issues Concerning Religion in the State
RCT 1155 Language and Intercultural Connection
THE 2810 Introduction to World Religions
THE 3250 Dialogue Among the Churches and Religions
THE 3310 The Theology of Peace: A Gospel Reflection on Violence and War
THE 3810 Anthropology of Religion
Students may also count approved foreign language and cultural instruction on the modern world beyond the core toward this requirement.

Global Politics and Environment
ANT/ESP 1120 Human Ecology
ANT 2400 Anthropology of Development
BIO 1070 Environmental Biology
ESP 3480 Environmental Geology
GEO 1001 World Geography
GEO 2001 National Resources and World Development
GEO 2002 Issues in Environmental Conservation
GOV/ESP 2170 Global Environmental Politics and Policies
GOV 2520 Politics of Environment and Development
PHI 3720 Environmental Ethics

International Relations
ANT 1100 Food and Culture
ANT 1155 Language and Intercultural Communication
ANT 1780; 1790 Off-Campus Topics in Multicultural and Multiethnic Studies I; II
ANT 2400 Anthropology of Development
ANT 2450 African Cultures
ANT 2740 Anthropology of Religion
ANT 2760 South Asian Society
ECO 3306 Comparative Economic Systems
ECO 3344 International Economics
ECO 3346 Economic Growth and Development
ENG 3520 Modern World Literature
ENG 3580 Postcolonial Literature
GEO 1001 World Geography
GEO 2001 National Resources and World Development
GOV 1700 Comparative Political Systems
GOV 2170 Global Environmental Politics and Policies
GOV 2640 Foreign Policy of the United States
GOV 2650 Government and Politics of Western Europe
GOV 2660 Government and Politics of Eastern Europe
GOV 2690 Government and Politics of Latin America
GOV 2730 Russia and the CIS Republics
GOV 2750 Politics of the Caribbean Area
GOV 2810 The Politics of War
GOV 3290 The Politics of Revolution
GOV 3570 Comparative Law
GOV 3620 International Law
GOV 3630 Foreign Policy of the Major Powers
GOV 3670 International Political Economy
GOV 3680 Politics of Africa
GOV 3710 Government and Politics of the Far East
GOV 3720 Government and Politics of South and Southeast Asia
GOV 3820 Politics of the Middle East
GOV 3850 Politics of Developing Countries
GOV 3851 Politics of Genocide
HIS 3160 History of Human Rights
HIS 3580 Wars of Empire
PHI 3660 Political Philosophy
PHI 3680 Philosophical Issues Concerning Religion in the State
SOC 2100 Global Poverty
SOC 2330 Human Trafficking
SOC 2420 Immigration and Inequality in the U.S.
SOC 3660 Political Sociology
THE 2810 Introduction to World Religions
THE 3250 Dialogue Among the Churches and Religions
THE 3310 The Theology of Peace: A Gospel Reflection on Violence and War
Students may also count approved foreign language and cultural instruction beyond the core toward this requirement.

Social Development
ANT 1100 Food and Culture
ANT 1155 Language and Intercultural Communication
ANT 1780; 1790 Off-Campus Topics in Multicultural and Multiethnic Studies I; II
ANT 2400 Anthropology of Development
ANT 2450 African Cultures
ANT 2740 Anthropology of Religion
ECO 3306 Comparative Economic Systems
ECO 3344 International Economics
ECO 3346 Economic Growth and Development
ESP 1120 Human Ecology
ESP 2170 Global Environmental Politics and Policies
GEO 1001 World Geography
GEO 2001 National Resources and World Development
GOV 1700 Comparative Political Systems
GOV 2520 Politics of Environment and Development
GOV 2660 Government and Politics of Eastern Europe
GOV 2690 Government and Politics of Latin America
GOV 2730 Russia and the CIS Republics
GOV 2750 Politics of the Caribbean Area
GOV 3670 International Political Economy
GOV 3680 Politics of Africa
GOV 3710 Government and Politics of the Far East
GOV 3720 Government and Politics of South and Southeast Asia
GOV 3820 Politics of the Middle East
GOV 3850 Politics of Developing Countries
HIS 2300 History of Africa
HIS 2301 Africa in the Colonial Period
HIS 2302 Contemporary Africa
HIS 2310 History of Asia
HIS 2311 History of East Asia
HIS 2312 History of Modern East Asia
HIS 2320 The Middle East
HIS 2321 History of Islamic Society
HIS 2330; 2331; 2332 History of Latin America; I; II
HIS 2450 History of the Modern Caribbean
HIS 3100 America Meets China
HIS 3120 The History of Racism in the West Since 1500
HIS 3150 History of Inter-American Relations
HIS 3180 America and the Muslim World
HIS 3340 Asian Pacific Diasporas in Modern History
HIS 3360 The History of Modern China
HIS 3370 Modern Wars in Asia
HIS 3400 African Civilizations and the Africa Diaspora
HIS 3653 The History of the Soviet Union and the Successor States
HIS 3850 Africa and the Atlantic
PHI 3660 Political Philosophy
PHI 3680 Philosophical Issues Concerning Religion in the State
PHI 3740 Social Justice
SOC 2100 Global Poverty
SOC 2330 Human Trafficking
SOC 2420 Immigration and Inequality in the U.S.
SOC 2470 Gender in a Global Context
SOC 2630 Urban Sociology
SOC 3660 Political Sociology

For more information, contact Dr. Brian Lockey, [email protected].

 

Students in the Italian American Studies minor must complete 18 credits of the following applicable courses:

ART 1250 Italian Sketchbook
ART 1780 The Art of the Renaissance in Italy (Abroad)
ART 1785 Italian Renaissance Art and Literature
ART 1790 Survey of Art and Architecture in Italy (Abroad)
ART 1795 The City of Rome (Abroad)
ART 2250 Drawing and Design in Rome
ART 2929 Culture of Southern Italy (Abroad)
CLS 2600 Roman Law and Society
ENG 1076 Italian American Literature
ENG 3680 Comparative Immigrant Literature
HIS 2002 Ancient Greek and Roman Civilization
HIS 3540 Modern Italian History
ITA 3540 Southern Italy: A Cultural Journey
ITA 3710 / MUS 1075 Trends in Italian Opera
SOC 1230 Italian American Identity in the Cinema
SOC 2410 Race and Ethnicity in America

A maximum of six credits of Italian language courses at all levels are also applicable to this minor. For more information, contact Dr. Florence Russo, [email protected].

Students who wish to complete the 18-credit Multicultural and Multiethnic Studies minor must take the following required courses in addition to nine credits from courses relating to cultures and civilizations. Each course must represent a different region of the world. Fifteen credits must be outside of the student’s major field of study.

Required Courses
ANT 1010 Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural
ANT 1040C Culture and Global Change
SPE 1155 / ANT 1155 Language and Intercultural Communication

Asia
ANT 2760 South Asian Society
ASC 1230 Contemporary China
ASC 1250 Contemporary Japan
ASC 1300; 1310 Introduction to the Civilizations of Asia I; II
ASC 1480 Introduction to Chinese Thought
ASC 1490 Introduction to Japanese Thought
ASC 1790 / THE 2830 Introduction to Hinduism
ASC 1800 / THE 2840 Introduction to Buddhism
ASC 2210 Chinese Literature in Translation
ASC 2500 / HIS 2310 History of Asia
ASC 2510 / HIS 2312 History of Modern East Asia
ASC 2710 / GOV 3710 Governments and Politics of the Far East
ASC 2720 / GOV 3720 Governments and Politics of South and Southeast Asia
PHI 3590 Confucianism and Taoism

Africa
ANT 2450 African Cultures
ENG 3330 African-American Literature to 1900
HIS 2302 Contemporary Africa
FRE 3820 French Afro-Caribbean Literature
GOV 3680 Politics of Africa

Middle East
GOV 3820 Politics of the Middle East
THE 2850 Introduction to Islam
THE 3860 The Family in Islamic Life and Theology

Latin America and the Caribbean
ANT 2440 Caribbean Cultures and Identities
GOV 2690 Government and Politics of Latin America
GOV 2750 Politics of the Caribbean Area
GOV 2760 The Politics of Puerto Rico
HIS 2331; 2332 History of Latin America I; II
FRE 3820 French Afro-Caribbean Literature
SPA 3100 Masterpieces of Hispanic Literature II
SPA 3560 Civilization of Spanish America
SPA 3700 The Spanish-American Novel
SPA 3730 Spanish-American Short Story
SPA 3740 Contemporary Spanish-American Poetry

Europe
GOV 2650 Government and Politics of Western Europe
GOV 2660 Government and Politics of Eastern Europe
FRE 3090; 3100 Masterpieces of French Literature I; II
FRE 3300 France’s Role within the European Community
FRE 3550; 3560 Civilization of France I; II
FRE 3600 Contemporary France
FRE 3630 17th-Century French Literature
FRE 3650 18th-Century French Literature
FRE 3670 19th-Century French Literature
FRE 3690 20th-Century French Literature
GER 3090; 3100 Masterpieces of German Literature I; II
GER 3550; 3560 Civilization of Germany I; II
HIS 3511; 3512 History of England I; II
HIS 3652 The History of Modern Russia
HIS 3653 The History of the Soviet Union and the Successor States
ITA 3090; 3100 Masterpieces of Italian Literature I; II
ITA 3550; 3560 Civilization of Italy I; II
RUS 3090; 3100 Masterpieces of Russian Literature I; II
SPA 3090 Masterpieces of Hispanic Literature I
SPA 3550 Civilization of Spain
SPA 3610 Spanish Golden Age Literature I
SPA 3770 Literature of Spain from the Generation of 1898 to the Civil War
SPA 3780 Spanish Literature after the Civil War
ENG 3540 Irish Literature

For more information, contact the St. John’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Dean’s Office in St. John Hall, room 145.

The 18-credit New York Studies minor requires students to complete DNY 1000C: Discover New York and 15 remaining credits from among the following:

ANT 4820 Archaeological Fieldwork
ART 1020 Art in New York
BLW 1040 Inside the Courts of New York
TVF 1740 Communications in New York
ECO 1019 Business Networking in New York City
ENG 3480 The Harlem Renaissance
ESP 1050 Natural History of Metropolitan New York
GOV 2470 State and Local Government and Administration
GOV 2480 Municipal Government and Administration
HIS 3760 History of New York City and Long Island
HIS 3770 Economic Geography of New York City
RCT 2090 Great Speeches in New York
SOC 1011Urban Sociology
SOC 1021 Sociology of Community
SOC 1080 Neighborhoods
SOC 1190 Sociology of Poverty in America
SOC 1220 Understanding New York
SOC 2460 Social Justice and the City
SOC 2630 Urban Sociology OR
SOC 1011 Urban Sociology
THE 3320 God and Religion in the City

Students may not take more than six credits from any one discipline and may not take more than six credits from mini-courses. For more information, contact Dr. Judith DeSena, [email protected].

Students in this 18-credit minor must complete the following requirements along with the Integrating Interdisciplinary Seminar in Social Justice and a minimum of 40 hours of service learning.

Required
THE 2320 Introduction to Catholic Social Teaching

Three credits from among the following courses:
PHI 2200C Ethics
PHI 2240C Ethics and Health Care
THE 2300 Introduction to Catholic Moral Theology

Three credits from among the following courses:
SOC 1190 Sociology of Poverty in America
ECO 1320 Poverty and Income Inequality (Abroad)

Six credits from among the following courses:
ART 1830 Racism in Film
BIO 1360 Biology and Society
CRJ 3005 Contemporary Social Problems in the Criminal Justice System
ECO 1024 The Economic Aspects of Discrimination in the United States
ESP 2160 / GOV 2160 American Environmental Politics and Policies
ESP 2170 / GOV 2170 Global Environmental Politics and Policies
GEO 2001 Natural Resources and World Development
GOV 3850 Politics of Developing Countries
HIS 3110 The Papacy Confronts the Modern World
HIS 3120 The History of Racism in the West Since 1500
HIS 3740 U.S.: Urban America
HIS 3780 Immigrants and the Catholic Church in the U.S.
LES 1018 Immigration Law
LES 1023 Environmental Law
LES 1024 Elder Law
PHI 3720 Environmental Ethics
PSY 1019 The Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination
SOC 1070 Social Problems
SOC 1170 Inequality; Race, Class and Gender
SOC 1590 Special Topics in Poverty Studies (Mini-Course)
SOC 2100 Global Poverty
SOC 2460 Social Justice and the City
SPE 2060 Argumentation: Inquiry and Advocacy
SPE 3150 Rhetoric of Social Movements
THE 3310 The Theology of Peace: A Gospel Reflection on Violence and War
THE 3320 God and Religion in the City

For more information, contact Rev. Jean-Pierre Ruiz, [email protected].

From the pages of great novels to the halls of political power, and from the corporate boardroom to the family home and place of worship, the impact of women and gender on our society has emerged as a vital field of study. The Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies minor at St. John’s University--open to all majors--covers a wide range of social, cultural, political, philosophical, historical, artistic, scientific, and literary issues from the vantage point of women, gender, and sexual minorities.

The program addresses the following critical questions:

  • How is gender socially constructed?
  • How does studying women and gender change how we understand society, history, the economy, and ideas of progress?
  • What is feminism?
  • How do feminist theorists envision a just society?
  • How do cultural ideas of masculinity shape politics and society?
  • Does the female novelist have a voice?
  • To what extent are the traditional goals of natural science androcentric?
  • Is the Enlightenment ideal of rationality gender-based?

Minor Program Requirements

Students choose 18 credits from among the following courses, taking no more than six credits in any one discipline:

ART 1840 Sexism in Cinema and Television
ART 3100 Women in the Arts
ANT 1110 Kinship, Family and Gender
CLS 1240 Women in the Ancient World
ENG 3260 Women Writers of the Nineteenth Century
ENG 3350 American Women Writers to 1900
ENG 3475 African-American Women’s Rhetorics
ENG 3570 Women and Literature
FRE 3830 French and Francophone Women Writers
FRE 3902 Women Writers in France
GOV 1280 Feminism and Politics
HIS 3140 History of Sexuality
HIS 3300 Women in Latin American History
HIS 3460 Gender in Islamic History
HIS 3560 Women in Medieval Europe
HIS 3562 Women in Modern Europe
HIS 3731 Women and Gender in Early America: from Settlement to the Civil War
HIS 3732 Women and Gender in Modern America: Civil War to the Present
HIS 3735 Women and Social Movements in U.S. History
ITA 3830 Women Writers in Italy
LAW 2110 Women and Crime
LLT 1240 Women in the Ancient World
LLT 3902 Women Writers in France
PHI 3330 Introduction to Feminist Philosophy
PSY 2240 Psychology of Women
SOC 1150 Sociology of the Family
SOC 1170 Inequality; Race, Class and Gender
SOC 1570 Gender, Violence, and the Movies (Mini-Course)
SOC 2020 Gender and Development
SOC 2110 Women and Crime
SOC 2220 Domestic Violence
SOC 2330 Human Trafficking
SOC 2430 Sociology of Gender
SOC 2440 Gender Identity in Popular Culture
SOC 2470 Gender in a Global Context
SOC 4990 Sociology Seminar
SPA 3902 Feminist Themes in Spanish Literature
THE 3240 Women and Theology

Minor credit may also be awarded for internships, with approval of the program director.

Career Options

The minor provides students with knowledge of the cultural, social, and political forces that shape our concepts of gender and the world around us. As an interdisciplinary program, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies allows students to develop strong analytical, communication, and research skills they can apply to any field. Students who minor in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies have enjoyed particular success in graduate programs in law, politics, philosophy, sociology, psychology, English, and social work.

As indicated in a recent report by the National Women’s Studies Association, “Women’s Studies reveals the gaps that emerge in other disciplines’ understandings of knowledge when scholars and researchers alike take into account gender, race, sexuality, religion, ethnicity, and ability as important research variables.” Above all, the report states that the field, “promotes access to institutions and to paradigms of knowledge” for people who are historically underrepresented in the academy, the professions, and society.

The Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies program sponsors events that allow students to engage with other scholars, teachers, and activists in the field, as well as diverse artistic and cultural expressions related to women, gender, and sexuality. Students have the opportunity to showcase their research and scholarship, and to build professional relationships relating to their interests, all of which contribute to career success.

More Information
Susan Schmidt Horning, Ph.D.
Program Director
718-990-6928
[email protected]