Judith Ryder

ProfessorGraduate Director for Criminology & Justice
Sociology and Anthropology
Ph.D., City University of New York

Judith Ryder, (Ph.D., City University of New York) Associate Professor, specializes in gender and family violence, has a broad background in criminology with a concentration in violence and trauma among adolescents considered within psychosocial and feminist theoretical frameworks.  She is the author of Girls and Violence, Tracing the Roots of Criminal Behavior (Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2013), in which she constructs a theoretical model of the dynamics underlying girls’ anti-social behaviors.  Her research has been published in numerous book chapters and peer-reviewed journals including Crime and Delinquency, Critical Criminology, Feminist Criminology, Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, and Women and Criminal Justice. In 2014, Dr. Ryder commenced a Visiting Fellowship at the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research at the University of Glasgow. A member of the editorial board of Contemporary Justice Review since 2008, Dr. Ryder also served as Editor-in-Chief of Criminal Justice Abstracts (2000-2010).

Grounded in community activism, Dr. Ryder’s scholarship has contributed to student participation in community-based projects, including the development of surveys for a teen drop-in center and providing tutoring for recently released offenders. She also has coordinated the annual campus Clothesline Project to raise awareness of violence against women and girls.

Book

Ryder, J. (2013). Girls and violence: Tracing the roots of criminal behavior. Qualitative
Criminological Studies Series, Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers.

Book Chapters

Ryder, J. (2011). Revamping the Altschuler and Armstrong Intensive Aftercare Program for use with girls in the juvenile justice system. In R. Immarigeon (Ed.), Women and girls in the criminal justice system: Vol. 2. Policy strategies and program options (Chapter 27). NewYork: Civic Research Institute. Reprint.
Ryder, J. (2011). Loss, violence and attachment among female juvenile offenders. In R.
Immarigeon (Ed.), Women and girls in the criminal justice system: Vol. 2. Policy strategies and program options (Chapter 26). New York: Civic Research Institute. Reprint.
Ryder, J. (2010). ‘I don’t know if you consider that as violence.’ Using attachment theory to understand girls’ perspectives on violence. In M. Chesney-Lind and N. Jones (Eds.),
Fighting for girls: New perspectives on gender and violence (pp.129-147). Women, Crime & Criminology Series. Albany, New York: State University of New York Press
Ryder, J., Gordon, C., & Bulger, J. (2009). Contextualizing girls’ violence: Assessment and treatment decisions. In J. Andrade (Ed.). Handbook of violence risk assessment and treatment: New approaches for mental health professionals (pp. 449-494). New York: Springer Publishing.
Ryder, J., Langley, S. & Brownstein, H. (2008). “I’ve been around and around and around.”Measuring traumatic events in the lives of incarcerated girls. In R. Muraskin (Series Ed.) &R. Gido & L. Dalley (Vol. Eds.), Women in Criminal Justice Series:
Women’s mental health issues across the criminal justice system (pp. 45-70). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
Refereed Journal Articles
Robinson, R. & Ryder, J. (Invited, November 2014). ‘Some people's kind of high’:
Psychodynamics of power and abuse amongst rural youth. Critical Criminology. Special
Issue on Rural Criminology.
Robinson, R. & Ryder, J. (In Press). ‘Sometimes one does that with blinders on’:
Revisioning care for violent girls. Women and Criminal Justice, 24 (3).
Robinson, R. & Ryder, J. (2013) Psychosocial perspectives of girls and violence:
Implications for policy and praxis. Critical Criminology, 21 (4): 431-445.
Ryder, J. & Brisgone, R. (2013). Cracked perspectives: Reflections of women and girls in the aftermath of the crack cocaine era. Feminist Criminology, 8 (1): 40-62.
Ryder, J. (2008). Revamping the Altschuler and Armstrong Intensive Aftercare Program for use with girls in the juvenile justice system. Women, Girls & Criminal Justice, 9(2)
February/March.
Ryder, J. (2007). ‘I wasn’t really bonded with my family’: Attachment, loss and violence
among adolescent female offenders. Critical Criminology 15(1): 19-40.
Ryder, J. (2006). Loss, violence and attachment among female juvenile offenders. Women,Girls and Criminal Justice 8(2) February/March.
Clear, T., Rose, D., & Ryder, J. (2001). Incarceration and the community. The problem of removing and returning offenders. Crime and Delinquency 47(3): 335-351.
Rose, D., Clear, T., & Ryder, J. (2001). Addressing the unintended consequences of
incarceration through community-oriented services at the neighborhood level. CorrectionsM anagement Quarterly 5(3): 62-71.
Liberty, H., Johnson, B., Jainchill, N., Ryder, J., Messina, M., Reynolds, S., & Hossain, M.(1998). Dynamic Recovery: Comparative study of therapeutic communities in homeless shelters for men. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 15(5): 401-423.

Encyclopedia Entries

Ryder, J. (2002). Auburn State prison. In D. Levinson (Ed.). Encyclopedia of Crime &
Punishment. (pp. 84-86). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.
Ryder, J. (2000). History of women’s prisons. In N. Rafter (Ed.). Encyclopedia on women and crime. (pp. 304-305). Phoenix: Oryx Press.
Book Review Essay
Ryder, J. (2013, May). Criminology goes to the movies. Crime theory
And popular culture by N. Rafter & M. Brown. Criminal Law and Criminal
Justice Books. http://clcjbooks.rutgers.edu/archived_reviews.html.
Newsletter Articles
Ryder, J. (2008). Doing the laundry: Sharing stories and healing the wounds of violence. St.John’s University’s Center for Teaching and Learning Newsletter, 13(7).
Hamann, T., Koziak, B., & Ryder, J. (2008). Pedagogical practices: Engaging students in learning. Connections. National Association for Women in Catholic Higher Education.

Journal Manuscripts in Progress

Ryder, J. & Altschuler, D. “Continuing to care: Girls and community reintegration.”
Ryder, J. “The Clothesline Project: Catalyst for engagement and the search for justice(s).”
Ryder, J. “Methadone madness: U.S. drug policy and the Nixon Administration