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TAX - BASIC FEDERAL PERSONAL INCOME
(TAXATION - 1030)
3 credits
This is an introductory course. Its purpose is to give students an understanding of the basic principles underlying the federal income tax and to develop a realization of its effect on the economic life of the community. The course concentrates on fundamental concepts such as the scope of gross income, specific exclusions, assignment of income, the major items of deduction, the amount realized on property dispositions, basis for gain or loss, characterization of gain or loss as capital or ordinary, credits, the taxable year, and the mechanics of computation of income tax liability. The development of the present tax system, the fiscal aspects of the income tax and the legislative, administrative, and judicial processes in the enactment and enforcement of the income tax laws are briefly considered. Grades are based upon a final examination.

TAX FEDERAL CORPORATE INCOME
(TAXATION – 1020)
3 credits
This course applies the principles of federal income taxation to problems arising from use of the corporate form.  The tax consequences to the corporation and to the shareholders are considered.  Major topics covered in the course include the tax treatment of incorporations, dividends, stock redemptions, liquidations, mergers and other corporate reorganizations.  Grades are based upon a final examination.  Pre-requisite: TAX BASIC FEDERAL PERSONAL INCOME

TAX FEDERAL ESTATE AND GIFT
(TRUSTS AND ESTATES - 1050)
3 credits
The purpose of this course is to give the students an understanding of the federal estate and gift tax laws and their underlying principles. The history of these taxes is reviewed and a brief survey is made of estate and gift tax procedures. Major estate tax topics covered are inclusion and exclusion from the gross estate of interests owned by the decedent, property transferred by the decedent during his lifetime, life insurance, jointly owned property, property subject to a power of appointment, and annuities. Gift tax topics include complete and incomplete gifts, adverse interests, the annual exclusion, the exercise and release of powers of appointment, transfers incident to marital separations, gift splitting, and indirect gifts. Estate and gift tax problems cover adequate consideration, the marital deduction, the charitable deduction, valuation and computation of tax liability. Income in respect of a decedent and generation skipping transfers are also examined briefly. Grades are based upon a final examination.

TAXATION OF BUSINESS ENTITIES
(TAXATION - 1070)
3 credits
A comparative survey of the federal income taxation of partnerships/limited liability companies, Subchapter C corporations (i.e., taxable corporations) and Subchapter S corporations (i.e., nontaxable corporations) - the principal entity choices for conducting business in the United States. Coverage includes formations, operations, distributions, sales of interests and liquidations. This course is especially suitable for students seeking an introduction to this material for a business or real estate practice. Students desiring more detailed exposure to corporate tax principles may also enroll in Tax: Federal Corporate Income. Grades are based upon a final examination.  Prerequisite: TAX BASIC FED PERSONAL INCOME

THE MIND OF MARSHALL
(THEORY, HIST. & STRUCTURE OF LAW - 2030)
1 credit
The Mind of Marshall - Historical Biography of the Great Chief Justice as Intellectual History of the Early Republic.  A legal history survey of the intellectual influences on John Marshall throughout his early and professional life that formed and informed the jurisprudence of the Chief Justice during his 34 years on the Supreme Court.  We will examine the different roles that comprised the Chief Justice’s earlier life, including frontier youth, Continental Army officer, prosperous private lawyer, state and federal legislator, diplomat, and Secretary of State.  What will emerge is a picture of a mostly home schooled and self-taught yet very learned man, a loyal follower of Washington, a rare Virginia Federalist, a reluctant participant in national government, and the "right man at the time" to lead the Supreme Court in its formative years as a co-equal branch of the federal government.  We will relate his early experiences to his jurisprudence on the court through examination of some of his landmark opinions like Marbury v. Madison and McCullough v. Maryland.  Grades will be based on a final examination.  Pre-requisite - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I

TORTS
(TORTS - 1040)
4 credits
The basic Torts course is an introduction to civil liability arising from breach of duties imposed by law, as distinguished from duties imposed by contract. The course will cover representative doctrines and theories of liability, including intentional torts, negligence and strict liability. Topics may include assault, battery, negligence, strict liability, products liability, misrepresentation, defamation and privacy. Grades are based upon a final examination

TRADEMARKS & UNFAIR COMPETITION
(INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY - 1070)
3 credits
This course undertakes a detailed examination of the law of trademarks and unfair competition. We will focus primarily on federal protection of trademarks and trade dress under the Trademark Act of 1946 (the Lanham Act). Additional topics will include federal unfair competition law (including false advertising), state-law rights of publicity, and legal issues relating to trademarks on the Internet. While focus of this course is United States trademark and unfair competition law, we will also address international issues as they arise. Grades are based upon a final examination. Pre-requisite: INTRODUCTION TO INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

TRANSACTIONS IN EMERGING MARKETS
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 2050)
2 credits
This class will examine the various issues faced by attorneys when representing clients in business transactions in emerging markets or developing countries. Students will be expected to master doctrinal issues such as the regulation of mergers and acquisitions, the variety of business organizations recognized under the U.S. and foreign jurisdictions, and different aspects of cross-border contracting. Students will also consider a variety of topics that affect the work of lawyers, including how cultural differences affect business negotiations, how cross-border deals are structured in order to achieve business goals, and how workflow is managed in a complex business transaction. Grades will be based on a research paper and on class presentation. N.B. Students who take this course are not permitted to take Transactions in Emerging Markets-Travel course.  Pre-requisite or Co-requisite: BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS OR INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS

TRANSACTIONS IN EMERGING MARKETS-TRAVEL
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 3070)
3 credits
This class will examine the various issues faced by attorneys when representing clients in business transactions in emerging markets or developing countries. Besides classroom work, students will meet business and legal leaders in New York involved in emerging markets transactions and will travel to Romania during Spring Break for meetings and visits in that country. (There will be a program fee covering hotel, airfare, transportation and other program costs; special registration applies.) As part of the course, students will be expected to master doctrinal issues such as the regulation of mergers and acquisitions, the protection of foreign investments, the variety of business organizations recognized under the U.S. and foreign jurisdictions, and different aspects of cross-border contracting. There is particular emphasis on cross-cultural negotiation and dispute resolution. Students will also consider a variety of topics that affect the work of lawyers, including how cross-border deals are structured in order to achieve business goals and how workflow is managed in a complex business transaction. Grades will be based on a research paper, a reflection paper based on the travel component, and on participation both in class and in the various visits. N.B. Students who take this course are not permitted to take Transactions in Emerging Markets.  Pre-requisite or Co-requisite: BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS OR INT'L BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS

TRANSNATIONAL LEGAL PRACTICE - PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW AND INSTITUTIONS
(TRANSNATIONAL LEGAL PRACTICE - 1060)
3 credits
This course introduces students to the core concepts of public international law and international organizations.  The course will cover the origins and sources of international law (treaty, custom and other sources), the enforcement of international law (through courts and other dispute settlement bodies) and the central international organizations that regulate relations between states.  Students will learn how international organizations are formed, and how they make, interpret and enforce international law.  Upon completion of the course, students should be able to indentify whether a particular legal question is subject to international legal regulation, and if so, what international organization or regulatory body has jurisdiction over the issue.  Students will also be expected to understand the distinction between binding and non-binding international rules, and to explain the different types of international dispute resolution mechanisms, as well as the distinctions between international, domestic and transnational forms of dispute resolution.  As a practice-oriented course, this course requires students to participate in weekly role plays, which are intended to mimic real-life practice scenarios, as well as prepare writing assignments. Grades are based on participation in role plays, writing assignments, and a final exam.

TRANSNATIONAL LEGAL PRACTICE - CROSS BORDER TRANSACTIONS AND DISPUTE RESOLUTION
(TRANSNATIONAL LEGAL PRACTICE - 1070)
3 credits each
This course is one of the two core courses for the Transnational Legal Practice LLM.   The purpose of the course is to prepare students for cross-border practice in a global legal environment.  This course introduces legal systems in comparative perspective, with a focus on transnational business transactions, litigation and dispute resolution. Students will be introduced to the distinctions between civil law and common law jurisdictions, as well as the basic framework of the U.S. legal system, including: (1) structure of government; (2) principles of tort, property and contract law; (3) business organizations; (4) intellectual property; and (5) court litigation. Students will also learn cross-border business law, including: (1) sale of goods; (2) licensing; and (3) direct foreign investment.  Finally, students will be introduced to transnational dispute resolution, including mediation and arbitration.  As a practice-oriented course, this course requires students to participate in weekly role plays, which are intended to mimic real-life practice scenarios, as well as prepare writing assignments. Grades are based on participation in role plays, writing assignments, and a final exam. 

TLP LEGAL WRITING I
(TRANSNATIONAL LEGAL PRACTICE - 1030)
3 credits
TLP Legal Research, Analysis, & Writing I - The first course in a two-semester sequence, this course teaches Transnational Legal Practice LL.M. students legal research, analysis, and writing. Enrollment in TLP Legal Research, Analysis, & Writing I automatically enrolls the student in TLP Legal Research, Analysis, & Writing II. The aim of this two-semester sequence is to help students analyze and brief cases, analyze and answer hypothetical questions in essay format, locate and understand standard legal research materials in English, and communicate with clients and other legal counsel in both written and spoken English. Students will be expected to complete all assigned reading, research, and writing work in a timely and professional manner and demonstrate this through effective class participation (25%). Written and oral exercises and assignments will also be assigned and graded (75%).

TLP LEGAL WRITING II
(TRANSNATIONAL LEGAL PRACTICE - 1040)
2 credits
TLP Legal Research, Analysis, & Writing II - The second course in a two-semester sequence, this course teaches Transnational Legal Practice LL.M. students legal research, analysis, and writing. Enrollment in TLP Legal Research, Analysis, & Writing I automatically enrolls the students in TLP Legal Research, Analysis, & Writing II. The aim of this two-semester sequence is to help students analyze and brief cases, analyze and answer hypothetical questions in essay format, locate and understand standard legal research materials in English, and communicate with clients and other legal counsel in both written and spoken English. Students will be expected to complete all assigned reading, research, and writing work in a timely and professional manner and demonstrate this through effective class participation (25%). Written and oral exercises and assignments will also be assigned and graded (75%).

TRIAL ADVOCACY
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS – 2065)
The course emphasizes learning basic trial advocacy skills, including voir dire, opening statements, summation, direct and cross examinations, evidentiary procedures, and working with expert witnesses. The course culminates in student teams litigating a full-day criminal or civil trial based upon a specially developed case file. The subject matter of the course will cover both civil and criminal trials. Grades are based upon in-class exercises (30%) and a mock trial (70%).  A student who takes this course may not also take Trial Advocacy -- Criminal or Trial Advocacy (Intensive).  Pre- or co-requisite: EVIDENCE.

TRIAL ADVOCACY-CONCENTRATED CIVIL
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS - 5060)
3 credits
The concentrated Civil Trial Advocacy Course meets on a concentrated schedule (six hours per week) during the middle seven weeks of the spring semester. Each week students attend a one hour lecture and demonstration class and participate in two 150 minute small-group simulation class. Two trial advocacy professors provide constructive critique, demonstrate skills, and encourage classroom exploration of case theory and approaches to the simulation assignment due in class. The course culminates in student teams litigating a full-day criminal or civil trial based upon a specially developed case file. The course emphasizes learning basic trial advocacy skills including voir dire, opening statements, summation, direct and cross examinations, evidentiary procedures, and working with expert witnesses. Grades are based upon class participation, ability to learn from critique, and the level of performance for each skill simulated, and the final trial. N.B. A student may take both civil and criminal trial advocacy but may not take either more than once (including Intensive or Concentrated courses but excluding any advanced trial advocacy courses which may be offered).  Pre-requisite: EVIDENCE

TRIAL ADVOCACY-CONCENTRATED CRIMINAL
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS - 6020)
3 credits
The concentrated Criminal Trial Advocacy Course meets on a concentrated schedule (six hours per week) during the middle seven weeks of the fall semester. Each week students attend a one hour lecture and demonstration class and participate in two 150 minute small-group simulation class. Two trial advocacy professors provide constructive critique, demonstrate skills, and encourage classroom exploration of case theory and approaches to the simulation assignment due in class. The course culminates in student teams litigating a full-day criminal trial based upon a specially developed case file.  
The course emphasizes learning basic trial advocacy skills including voir dire, opening statements, summation, direct and cross examinations, evidentiary procedures, and working with expert witnesses. Grades are based upon class participation, ability to learn from critique, and the level of performance for each skill simulated, and the final trial. N.B. A student may take both civil and criminal trial advocacy but may not take either more than once (including Intensive or Concentrated courses but excluding any advanced trial advocacy courses which may be offered).  Pre-requisite: EVIDENCE

TRIAL ADVOCACY - CRIMINAL
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS - 1080)
3 credits
The trial of criminal cases will be analyzed. The conduct of both defense counsel and prosecutor will be considered in detail with due consideration given to the application of the rules of evidence, openings, summations, jury selection, and trial strategy. Grades are based upon the student's performance in a jury trial. N.B. A student may take both civil and criminal trial advocacy, but may not take either more than once (including Intensive or Concentrated courses but excluding any advanced trial advocacy courses which may be offered).  Pre-requisite: EVIDENCE

TRIAL ADVOCACY (INTENSIVE)
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS - 4070)
3 credits
The Intensive Trial Advocacy Course is a two-week, full-time interactive course in which students participate in small group simulations, critique and attend a substantive lecture each day. The course culminates in student teams litigating a full-day criminal or civil trial based upon a specially developed case file. The course emphasizes learning basic trial advocacy skills including voir dire, opening statements, summation, direct and cross examinations, evidentiary procedures, and working with expert witnesses. The subject matter of the course will alternate between civil and criminal each year. Grades are based upon class participation, ability to learn from critique and the level of performance for each skill simulated. N.B. A student may take both civil and criminal trial advocacy, but may not take either more than once (including Intensive or Concentrated courses but excluding any advanced trial advocacy courses which may be offered).  Pre-requisite: EVIDENCE

TRUSTS AND ESTATES
(TRUSTS AND ESTATES - 1040)
4 credits
This course treats intestate succession, wills, trusts, and future interests as integrated elements in the planning of family property settlements. Income, estate and gift tax implications of various arrangements are discussed, to the extent necessary to illuminate the nontax material. Fiduciary and investment aspects of the law of trusts are analyzed, as are the traditional construction, class gift and perpetuity problem areas. Grades are based upon a final examination.