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JEWISH LAW
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 1080)
2 credits
This course provides a forum for students to explore the history, literature and process of Jewish Law. No knowledge of Hebrew or prior study of Jewish Law is required for the course. Following introductory classes on the sources and structure of Jewish Law, the course will examine the dynamics of the legal system by looking at such areas as: Biblical interpretation in civil and ritual law; capital punishment; self-incrimination; the duty of confidentiality; abortion; the interaction of Jewish Law with other legal systems; and the application of Jewish Law in the Israeli legal system. There will be an emphasis on comparative analysis, and course materials will include discussion of Jewish Law in contemporary American legal scholarship. Grades are based upon a research paper, a draft of which each student will present to the class toward the end of the semester.

JOINT COLLOQUIUM IN LAW: SELECTED TOPICS
(STATE AND FEDERAL PRACTICE - 3090)
2 credits
This seminar, conducted jointly with a partner law school, invites faculty from outside St. John's to present scholarship around a general theme chosen by the instructor(s). The two schools are connected by video link, so that students and faculty at both schools are able to participate synchronously in a virtual classroom seminar experience. Students are required to write short "reflection papers" (1500 words each) analyzing the scholarship presented, discuss these reflection papers in class, and participate in exchanges with the visiting scholars. Enrollment is based on interviews with the instructor(s) and limited to 12 students. The instructor(s) make enrollment decisions on the basis of students' academic credentials, demonstrated interest in legal scholarship, and career plans and opportunities. Grading will be done separately by school.

JURISPRUDENCE
(THEORY, HISTORY & STRUCTURE OF LAW - 1010)
2 credits
This course inquires into the fundamental notions of law, equity, and justice, and examines their contemporary applications. The classic schools of jurisprudence are the major foci of the course, including natural law, historicism, positivism, and realism. Grades are based upon a final examination.

JUVENILE JUSTICE
(CRIMINAL LAW - 1020)
2 credits
The course explores a wide-range of juvenile justice issues, covering the history of the juvenile court; the due process "revolution" of the 1960's; disparate treatment of children and adults involved in the legal system; and issues in a juvenile delinquency case from intake to disposition. In addressing these topics, principles of adolescent development and youths' special needs as well as disproportionate minority contact with the juvenile system will be examined. The course will also contemplate sociological and psychological theories and recent developments in adolescent brain development. Throughout the course, we will regularly visit the original ideology of the juvenile court and question its rehabilitative ideal. Grades are based upon a final examination.  Pre-requisite: CRIMINAL LAW