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IMMIGRATION LAW
(INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS - 1030)
2 credits
This course deals in general with the legal and administrative problems encountered by aliens who have emigrated lawfully and unlawfully to the United States. The course is significantly topical in light of the rapidly increasing number of unauthorized aliens present in the United States. Basic to the course is a study of federal administrative law as it relates to the problems of the immigrant, but issues of constitutional law, criminal law, domestic relations and commercial law are also treated insofar as they pertain to immigration and nationality law. Grades are based upon a final examination and class participation.

IN-HOUSE COUNSEL: LAW & PRACTICE
(BUSINESS AND FINANCE – 4040)
2 credits
This course will explore the practice of law from the perspective of in-house counsel.  It will cover the legal and practical issues typically encountered by in-house counsel with an emphasis on the significant role that risk assessment, judgment and communication style play in the in-house practice, culminating with an event in which each student will be required to prepare and make a simulated Board presentation.  Pre-requisite: BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS

INSURANCE LAW
(BUSINESS AND FINANCE LAW - 2030)
2 credits
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the fundamental legal principles of life, property, accident and health, and liability insurance. Special attention is given to sections of the New York Insurance Law relating to standard policy clauses and forms. The selected cases afford a complete common-law coverage and such basic insurance concepts as insurable interest, warranty, waiver, estoppel, notice and proof of loss and the scope and effect of the insurance contract. Grades are based upon a final examination.

INTERNATIONAL & COMPARATIVE SPORTS LAW
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 3040)
2 credits
This course explores contemporary legal issues in intercollegiate, professional and Olympic sports from an international and comparative perspective. It examines antitrust, contract, the regulation of private associations, intellectual property, and labor law issues. A portion of the course will be devoted to the regulation of agents and the representation of professional athletes. Grades are based on a final examination. Students who take this course are not permitted to take Sports Law.

INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE SPORTS LAW
(INTERNATIONAL SPORTS LAW - 1020)
4 credits
This course is taken by students in the International & Comparative Sports Law LL.M. program.  Students will gain in-depth knowledge of substantive law and acquire practice skills for the international sports market through lectures as well as country and case studies.  Some of the topics may include comparative contracts and labor law, compliance with foreign national, regional, and international regulatory regimes, transnational commercial sponsorship and merchandising, transnational trades, and managing an international brand-name franchise.  Students will gain valuable knowledge concerning real-world issues affecting sports teams, leagues, regulators, and individual athletes operating in foreign regional and international sports markets.  Completion of this course is required for an LL.M. in International & Comparative Sports Law.  This course is graded based on a midterm examination (40%) and a final examination (60%).  The professor may increase or decrease a semester grade by the instructor’s own observations and feedback of guest lecturers for the course.  Co-requisite: DISP RES SPORTS NEG MEDIAT ARBU. S. SPORTS LAW.

INTERNATIONAL & COMPARATIVE SPORTS LAW PRACTICE WRITING TUTORIAL
(INTERNATIONAL SPORTS LAW - 1050)
3 credits
This writing course is taken by LL.M. students participating in an international and comparative sports law practicum. Students may submit inter alia memoranda of law, client letters, formal meeting minutes, contract documents, negotiation memoranda, foreign or domestic law summaries, trademark documents, compliance analyses, case analyses, reports of investigation, trip reports, staff summaries, background papers, or regulatory analyses. The student will, at the completion of this course, have a comprehensive portfolio of professional writing relevant to the work undertaken throughout their international and comparative sports law practicum. This course is graded based on the quality of submitted written work. Admission to this course is contingent upon admission to the International & Comparative Sports Law LL.M. practicum and successful completion of this course is required in order to receive an LL.M. in International & Comparative Sports Law.  Pre-requisites: U. S. SPORTS LAW; INTERNATIONAL & COMPARATIVE SPORTS LAW; DISPUTE RESOLUTION FOR SPORTS; and ADVANCED TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL & COMPARATIVE SPORTS LAW

INTERNATIONAL ART & CULTURAL HERITAGE LAW
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 2060)
2 credits
International Art and Cultural Heritage Law provides students with knowledge about the field of international art and cultural heritage law. While focusing on the practical and legal aspects of the international art world, the student will also be introduced to public international law and private international law, including fundamentals of international business transactions, admiralty law and intellectual property law particularly copyright. Grades will be based on class participation and a final.

INTERNATIONAL BANKING
(BUSINESS AND FINANCE LAW - 3090)
2 credits
The course will explore the structure of and policy bases for divergent views regarding government regulation of banking institutions in Europe, with a focus on the European Union, and the United States. It also explores the nature of United States regulation of U.S. banks operating abroad and foreign banks operating in the United States. The course will examine the following topics (among others): (a) bank versus non-bank powers of financial institutions, comparing the U.S. holding company model with the European departmental and universal banking model, (b) operations across boundaries, comparing the U.S. model of state branching which is now evolving into nationwide branching with the EU model of nationwide branching which is now evolving into cross-national branching, (c) the government safety net, comparing the U.S. deposit insurance system with the deposit insurance system preceding the European Deposit Guarantee Directive and that following the Directive, (d) government supervision, comparing dual regulation (state - federal) in the United States with central regulation in most European nations, (e) international investments and activities, focusing on U.S. and foreign regulations governing operations of U.S. banks abroad, e.g. the European Union, and foreign banks in the United States, (f) the trend toward internationalization of regulatory requirements, e.g. risk based capital standards, lender of last resort responsibility, and universal banking, and (g) current issues in international banking, such as bank secrecy laws and the U.S. Patriot Act. Grades are based upon a final examination.

INTERNATIONAL BANKRUPTCY
(BANKRUPTCY LAW - 5070)
2 credits
This course covers all aspects of international bankruptcy. The comparative insolvency law component of the course will cover the major bankruptcy systems used around the world. Then students will study how those systems interact in the component devoted to managing cross-border cases. Finally the course will review the European Union regulation on cross-border insolvency and the use of the U.S. Chapter 11 procedure by foreign companies. The course will be taught by a variety of guest lecturers from around the world who are leading experts on these topics. The lectures will be offered in real-time interactive audio/video format. In addition, a St. John's professor will be on-site to supervise each session and answer questions students may have. Evaluation will be based on an examination. Class participation may be factored into the final grade. Pre-requisite for J.D. students: CREDITOR'S RIGHTS.  Recommended co-requisite: Reorganization Under Chapter 11 is a recommended pre- or co-requisite.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 1020)
3 credits
This course is designed to introduce the student to some of the major legal issues that arise in doing business across national boundaries. Among the topics to be considered are the international sale of goods and services, foreign investment, technology transfer, national, regional and international regulation of international trade, extraterritoriality, the European Union, and doing business in developing countries. Grades are based upon a final examination and class participation.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS - SUMMER ABROAD PROGRAM
(INTERNAT'L AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 4030)
2 credits
This course is designed to introduce the student to some of the major legal issues that arise in doing business across national boundaries. Among the topics to be considered are the international sale of goods and services, foreign investment, technology transfer, national, regional and international regulation of international trade, extraterritoriality, the European Union, and doing business in developing countries. Students who take this course are not permitted to take the 3-credit-hour International Business Transactions course (International and Comparative Law 1020). Grades are based upon a final examination and class participation.

INTERNATIONAL CIVIL LITIGATION
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 2080)
2 credits
This course will explore selected procedural issues affecting foreign litigants in the United States, U.S. citizens litigating in foreign jurisdictions, and special problems which arise in multiparty complex litigation. There will be an emphasis on comparative law analysis, and course materials will include relevant U.S. and foreign statutes, treaties and conventions. The topics which will be examined include jurisdictional issues involving foreign nationals, service of process abroad, discovery abroad, recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments in the United States, and of United States judgments abroad, and different approaches to multi-party and representative litigation. In addition, comparative approaches to payment of litigation costs and attorneys' fees and court-annexed dispute resolution will also be considered.  Pre-requisite: CIVIL PROCEDURE

INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS - 6070)
2 credits
Arbitration is an increasingly important component of international commerce. This course will cover several aspects of international commercial arbitration, including the advantages and disadvantages of arbitration; the question of arbitrability; the appointment of arbitrators and the potential for conflicts of  
interest; the choice of law to govern the arbitration; the presentation of the case; and the enforcement of arbitral awards. Throughout, we will assess whether we are witnessing the emergence of a new, stateless regime for the resolution of international commercial disputes. Grades are based upon a final examination.

INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 2030)
2 credits
This course covers jurisdiction in international law, extradition and its legal and constitutional bases, the nature of international crimes in customary international law, including genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity and torture. This course will also consider the proposed international Criminal Court and the Rome Statute of 1998. Grades are based upon a final exam.

INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
(ENVIRONMENTAL LAW - 1030)
2 credits
This course surveys the leading legal instruments and approaches to dealing with regional and global environmental problems. It will address transboundary air and water pollution, mass catastrophes, protection and allocation of freshwater supplies, stewardship of ocean resources such as fisheries, protection of the atmosphere (including the ozone layer and climate change), transport and trade in hazardous chemicals and waste, and biodiversity. The course will explore the environmental side of new approaches to economic regulation, including the world trade regime, and emerging ideas about sustainable development. Grades are based upon a final examination.

INTERNATIONAL FINANCE
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 4090)
3 credits
This course provides a survey of major themes in international finance in relation to common cross-border deals such as corporate mergers and acquisitions and project financings.  Students will learn about different methods of financing such international deals, the regulatory issues involved, and the techniques to assess, allocate, and address related risks.  Grades will be based on a deal analysis memorandum (20%) and on a final examination (80%).  Prerequisite: BUSINESS ORGANIZATION

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS ADVANCED TOPICS:
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 5000)
3 credits
This is an advanced topics course in the study of International Human Rights law.  Topics of this course may include human rights theory, human rights and development, environmental rights, regional human rights courts and commissions, women's rights, children's rights and disability under international human rights.  It is anticipated that students will be required to write research papers (for JD students these may satisfy the Advanced Scholarly Writing Requirement (ASWR)).

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS LAW ADVANCED TOPICS:
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 5010)
1 credit
This is an advanced topics course in the study of cross-border business transactions.  Topics of this course may include project development, cross-border mergers and acquisitions, global corporate compliance, cross-border employment law, international competition (antitrust) law, and cross-border IP licensing.  It is anticipated that students will be required to write research papers (for JD students these may satisfy the Advanced Scholarly Writing Requirement (ASWR). Prerequisite: BUSINESS ORGANIZATION  Corequisite: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 2010)
3 credits
This course represents a survey of international human rights law and teaches how international organizations, regional organizations, states and non-state actors define and enforce human rights. Beginning with the historical origins of human rights, the course will examine the international and regional human rights instruments and institutions that form the sources of human rights law (the UN system, including the Charter and treaties, European, African and Inter-American human rights regimes, and customary international law). It will also examine the role of non-governmental organizations, international criminal tribunals (including the International Criminal Court) and international humanitarian law (the law of war), and the interaction between U.S. law and international human rights. Throughout the course, students will be introduced to important critical themes of human rights, including: the distinction between public and private acts, evolving theories of statehood, sovereign immunity, and cultural relativism and the western tradition of individual rights. Issues examined may include: political participation and democratization, religious freedom, the use of torture, corporate liability, women's rights, children's rights, the rights and status of refugees, economic and social rights, genocide and war crimes. The grade will be based upon either a final exam or a research paper, as determined by the professor. The determination will be communicated to the students in the registration materials.

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW—EUROPEAN PROGRAM
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 3050)
2 credits
International Human Rights Law will start with an historical introduction to the field, first looking at the pre-WWII status of human rights (including not only civil and political rights, but also social, cultural and economic rights as well as solidarity or communitarian rights) in the context of traditional international law and then focusing on post-WWII developments. Next, the course will look at sources of international human rights law and procedures available to enforce and ensure enforcement of human rights violations, including regional arrangements, U.N. procedures and the role of fact-finding, and the role of Non-Governmental Organizations. The class also will study the role of international human rights law in U.S. domestic law. In addition, the following topics will be covered: the role of international tribunals; humanitarian law and its relationship to human rights; the nature of rights as universal or relative to culture; self-determination; rights of indigenous peoples; women, racial/ethnic and cultural minorities; right to development; and the obligations of states as protectors and enforcers of human rights. Grades are based on a final exam. Students who take this course are not permitted to take International Human Rights Law (3 credits).

INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
(INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY - 2070)
3 credits
This course provides an overview of the principles of international protection and enforcement of intellectual property and of the major treaty regimes and institutions that underlie such protection. It will address substantive international law regarding protection of copyright, patent, trademark, and other forms of intellectual property; procedural treaties and agencies designed to facilitate international recognition of intellectual property rights; dispute resolution and choice of law issues. Where appropriate, comparative legal materials from foreign jurisdictions will be introduced. Introduction to Intellectual Property is a pre-requisite for this course. International Law is strongly recommended as a preparation for this course. Grades will be based on a final examination.  Prerequisite: INTRO TO INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY-SA
(INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY - 2080)
2 credits
This course provides an overview of the principles of international protection and enforcement of intellectual property and of the major treaty regimes and institutions that underlie such protection. It will address substantive international law regarding protection of copyright, patent, trademark, and other forms of intellectual property; procedural treaties and agencies designed to facilitate international recognition of intellectual property rights; dispute resolution and choice of law issues. Where appropriate, comparative legal materials from foreign jurisdictions will be introduced. Introduction to Intellectual Property and International Law are recommended as preparation for this course. Grades will be based on a final examination.

INTERNATIONAL LAW
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 1040)
3 credits
The International Law course surveys that system of jurisprudence dealing with the precepts and principles that govern the community of nations in their mutual dealings as they have developed from early history to modern times. After an analysis of the nature and sources of international law, the course will examine topics such as recognition, succession, territory of states, sovereignty, jurisdiction, extradition, state immunity, international agreements, international claims, human rights and use of force. Grades are based upon a final examination and class participation.

INTERNATIONAL LAW ADVANCED PRACTICE WRITING TUTORIAL
(INTERNATIONAL LAW - 4020)
3 Credits
This writing course, designed to fulfill the J.D. program’s APWR, is taken by students participating in an international practicum.  Students may submit to their on-site Adjunct Professor  inter alia memoranda of law, client letters, aide-mémoires, formal meeting minutes, foreign law summaries, treaty commentaries, case analyses, reports of investigation, trip reports, staff summaries, background papers, or regulatory drafts.  The student will, at the completion of this course, have a comprehensive portfolio of professional writing relevant to the work undertaken throughout their international practicum. This course is graded based upon the quality of submitted written work.  Co-requisites:  INTERNATIONAL LAW PRACTICUM and INTERNATIONAL LAW DIRECTED RESEARCH.  

INTERNATIONAL LAW AND THE CONSTITUTION
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 4060)
2 credits
This course examines the U.S. constitutional doctrines applicable to how international law is made, implemented and interpreted in the United States. Topics include the distribution of international relations powers between the three branches of the federal government, the use of force under the Constitution and international law, the status of international law in U.S. courts, the scope of the treaty power, the validity of executive agreements, the intersection of federalism on international law obligations, and judicial doctrines applicable to international relations questions in U.S. courts.  Prerequisite: CONSTITUTIONAL LAW.

INTERNATIONAL LAW DIRECTED RESEARCH
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 4010)
3 Credits
This writing course, designed to fulfill the J.D. program’s ASWR, is taken by students participating in an international practicum.  The student, the on-site Adjunct Professor, and a St John’s Professor Liaison will, within 30 days of commencing the practicum, decide upon a research topic both of interest to the student and of value to the host organization.  The research may be undertaken in conjunction with the student’s assigned practicum duties, but the resulting research paper must meet all ASWR requirements and will be evaluated at all stages by the St. John’s Professor Liaison.  Co-requisites: INTERNATIONAL LAW PRACTICUM and INTERNATIONAL LAW ADVANCED-PRACTICE WRITING TUTORIAL.    

INTERNATIONAL LAW PRACTICUM—NATO
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 4000)
7 Credits
This unique practicum provides carefully selected second- and third-year students (and evening students who have completed at least three semesters) the opportunity to gain practice experience in public international law and national security law through work and study at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s Office of Legal Education in Mons, Belgium.  This five month, full time, in-residence practicum exposes students to the daily practice of public international law, including international agreements; international, regional, and national law; the function of staff legal counsel; legal support to defense forces; comparative law challenges; legal education programs; international criminal tribunals; and organizational policies, standards, and procedures.  Students will have the opportunity to work closely with experienced public international law practitioners through day-to-day contact, informal mentoring, and regular tutorial sessions allowing students an opportunity for guided reflection on their work and research with experienced practitioners.  This course is pass/fail.  Because this course is limited to one student each in the fall and spring semesters, permission to enroll in this course will be by application and competitive selection.  Pre-requisites: INTERNATIONAL LAW or NATIONAL SECURITY AND THE LAW.  Co-requisites:  INTERNATIONAL LAW ADVANCED PRACTICE WRITING TUTORIAL and INTERNATIONAL LAW DIRECTED RESEARCH.

INTERNATIONAL LAW PRACTICUM—UN VIENNA
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 4001)
7 credits
This unique practicum provides carefully second- and third-year students (and evening students who have completed at least three semesters) the opportunity to gain practice experience in public international law and specialized international legal practice through work and study at a UN agency headquartered in Vienna, Austria. This semester length, full time, in-residence practicum exposes students to the daily practice of public international law, including international agreements; international, regional, and national law; the function of international organization staff legal counsel; legal support to UN member governments and other UN agencies; comparative law challenges; legal education programs; international administrative and criminal tribunals; and organizational policies, standards, and procedures. Students will have the opportunity to work closely with experienced public international law practitioners through day-to-day contact, informal mentoring, and regular tutorial sessions allowing students an opportunity for guided reflection on their work and research with experienced practitioners. This course is pass/fail. Permission to enroll in this course will be by application and competitive selection at St. John's and by application and acceptance by the UN agency. Prerequisites: International Law and other course(s), as required. Co-requisites: International Law Advanced Practice Writing Tutorial and International Law Directed Research.  Prerequisite: INTERNATIONAL LAW. Co-requisites:  INTERNATIONAL LAW ADVANCED PRACTICE WRITING TUTORIAL and INTERNATIONAL LAW DIRECTED RESEARCH.

INTERNATIONAL LEGAL RESEARCH
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS - 8050)
1 credit
This course teaches the tools and resources of international legal research, with a particular emphasis on public international law. In addition, students will learn some techniques of comparative legal research and will closely examine certain primary sources of international law such as various treaties, including the United Nations Charter, and the Statute of the International Court of Justice. Although there is no required pre- or co-requisite, students are strongly encouraged to have already taken or to be concurrently enrolled in one of the following classes: International Law, International Business Transactions, International Banking, International Civil Litigation, International Commercial Arbitration, International Criminal Law, International Environmental Law, International Human Rights, International Sales Law and Arbitration, International Trade Law, Comparative Election Law, Counseling in the Global Community, Global Philanthropy and U.S. Aid, Globalization of the Legal Profession, Law and Religion Seminar: Comparative and International Perspectives, Law of the European Union, Transactions in Emerging Markets, or another similar class focused on international legal issues. Grades will be based on assigned exercises.

INTERNATIONAL LITIGATION & DISPUTE RESOLUTION
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 2020)
3 credits
This course will explore selected procedural issues affecting foreign litigants in the United States, U.S. citizens litigating in foreign jurisdictions, and special problems which arise in multi-party complex litigation. There will be an emphasis on comparative law analysis, and course materials will include relevant U.S. and foreign statutes, treaties and conventions. The topics which will be examined include jurisdictional issues involving foreign nationals, service of process abroad, discovery abroad, recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments in the United States, and of United States judgments abroad, and different approaches to multi-party and representative litigation. In addition, comparative approaches to payment of litigation costs and attorneys' fees and court-annexed dispute resolution will also be considered. Grades are based upon a final examination. N.B. Students who take this course are not permitted to take the two-credit International Litigation Seminar.  Pre-requisite: CIVIL PROCEDURE

INTERNATIONAL LITIGATION SEMINAR
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 1030)
2 credits
This course provides students with an opportunity to work on selected issues in international litigation and arbitration. Among the topics that may be examined are: extraterritorial jurisdiction, the Act of State doctrine, foreign sovereign immunity, and recognition of foreign country judgments in the U.S. and abroad. Students are required to brief and argue a moot court case. Grades are based upon the moot court exercise and class participation. N.B. Students who take this course are not permitted to take the three-credit International Litigation: Procedural Issues.

INTERNATIONAL PRACTICUM - INTERNATIONAL & COMPARATIVE SPORTS LAW
(INTERNATIONAL SPORTS LAW - 1040)
6 credits
This practicum provides International & Comparative Sports Law LL.M. students the opportunity to gain valuable practice experience in sports law related entities. This semester long, full time, in-residence practicum exposes students to the daily practice of international and comparative sports law, including regulatory compliance, negotiations, mediations, drafting complex contracts, marketing and branding rights, intellectual property protection, labor standards, administrative and criminal sanctions, and other sports related areas of practice. Students will work closely with experienced practitioners through day-to-day contact, informal mentoring, and regular tutorial sessions allowing students an opportunity to reflect on their work and research. Students will, after successful completion of this practicum, have strong experience in the knowledge, method, and practice of international and comparative sports law. Students are selected for this course through admission to the International & Comparative Sports Law LL.M. program. Successful completion of this course is required for the LL.M. in International & Comparative Sports Law. The student's on-site supervisor also serves as an adjunct professor at St. John's and, in the capacity, will assess daily the student's work, including research, professional writing, demonstrated mastery of the law, as well as the student's effective contribution to the work of the office. Students will be expected to complete all assigned reading, research and writing work in a timely and professional manner. Students will be graded pass/fail.  Pre-requisites: U. S. SPORTS LAW; INTERNATIONAL & COMPARATIVE SPORTS LAW; DISPUTE RESOLUTION FOR SPORTS; and ADVANCED TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL & COMPARATIVE SPORTS LAW

INTERNATIONAL SALES LAW & ARBITRATION
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS - 8010)
2 credits
This course provides an overview of the law governing international sales of goods and international commercial arbitration, focusing primarily on the U.N. Convention on the International Sale of Goods, the UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration, and the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards. The first half of the course will provide an overview of these two doctrinal areas. In the second half of the course, students will apply these legal doctrines to the subject matter of the problem to be argued in the Annual Willem C. Vis Int'l Commercial Arbitration Moot. Working in teams, students research and analyze the problem, draft a brief in support of one of the parties, and participate in oral arguments before a mock arbitration panel. A team of students from the class will be selected to represent St. John's in the Vis Moot competition in Vienna during the following spring semester. Grades are based on classroom participation, written assignments, demonstration of the skills taught, and the preparation of the written brief. Any student interested in representing St. John's in the annual Vis Moot competition must take this course during the fall of the year in which he or she wishes to try out for the team.

INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE SPORTS LAW
(INTERNATIONAL SPORTS LAW - 1020)
4 credits
This course is taken by students in the International & Comparative Sports Law LL.M. program.  Students will gain in-depth knowledge of substantive law and acquire practice skills for the international sports market through lectures as well as country and case studies.  Some of the topics may include comparative contracts and labor law, compliance with foreign national, regional, and international regulatory regimes, transnational commercial sponsorship and merchandising, transnational trades, and managing an international brand-name franchise.  Students will gain valuable knowledge concerning real-world issues affecting sports teams, leagues, regulators, and individual athletes operating in foreign regional and international sports markets.  Completion of this course is required for an LL.M. in International & Comparative Sports Law.  This course is graded based on a midterm examination (40%) and a final examination (60%).  The professor may increase or decrease a semester grade by the instructor’s own observations and feedback of guest lecturers for the course.  Co-requisite: DISP RES SPORTS NEG MEDIAT ARBU. S. SPORTS LAW.

INTERNATIONAL TAXATION
(TAXATION - 1050)
3 credits
This course will survey the U.S. income taxation of nonresident alien individuals and foreign corporations involved in business transactions and investment activities in the United States, as well as on the U.S. income taxation of domestic corporations and U.S. citizens with foreign income producing activities. As part of the discussion of these topics, coverage will address the taxation of U.S. shareholders of controlled foreign corporations; the role of the foreign tax credit for U.S. citizens and domestic corporations; the role of the withholding tax applicable to nonresident individuals and foreign corporations; the branch profits tax; special status foreign corporations, such as passive foreign investment companies; transfer pricing; and the role of tax treaties. Class discussion will also include basic federal corporate tax concepts when important to the understanding of these topics. Grades are based upon a research paper.  Prerequisite: TAX BASIC FED PERSONAL INCOME

INTERNATIONAL TRADE LAW
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW – 2070)
2 credits
This course examines the laws, institutions, and policies governing international trade in goods and services, focusing on the World Trade Organization and General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, preferential trade agreements such as the North American Free Trade Agreement, and U.S. laws regulating trade.  Topics include the institutions and processes of trade policy-making, negotiations, and dispute settlement; tariffs and market access; non-discrimination; antidumping and countervailing (anti-subsidy) measures; trade-related aspects of intellectual property; trade and development; and the relationship of trade rules to “non-trade” issues such as public health, food safety, environmental protection, and labor standards.  Grades will be based on four legal memoranda (90%) and class participation (10%).

INTERNET LAW
(INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY - 1090)
2 credits
This course will study the emerging law and policy of the Internet through topics including intellectual property, e-commerce, online speech and defamation, and privacy. The class will build upon current cases such as Napster and the Microsoft antitrust trial and will examine the relations of these online controversies to "off-line" law. No technical experience is required. Grades are based upon a research paper and class participation, including some online assignments.

INTERVIEWING AND COUNSELING
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS - 7020)
2 credits
This course offers students an opportunity to develop skills in interviewing and counseling, including gathering information, ascertaining the client's interests, developing specific goals and strategies, and ethical considerations a lawyer is required to consider. Classroom work will involve the exploration of techniques of interviewing and counseling, focusing on the unique relationship of lawyer and client. Students will develop the skills studied by participating in simulated exercises that involve realistic situations raising common legal and ethical issues. Grades are based on classroom participation, demonstration of the skills taught, and the submission of written work.

INTRODUCTION TO BANKRUPTCY PRACTICE: CASE ANALYSIS
(BANKRUPTCY LAW - 5010)
2 credits
This course, open to second-year day or third-year evening staff members of the ABI Law Review, simulates the working environment of a law firm bankruptcy practice group. Students assume the role of entry-level associates who conduct time-sensitive research and writing assignments on cutting-edge bankruptcy issues. After completing a series of preliminary research and writing assignments under the supervision of the instructor, who will provide feedback and suggestions for revision, students will submit a professional-quality work product to an electronic forum. Each student will monitor the discussion of his or her posting, and update it as necessary. Drawing on the insights offered by bankruptcy practitioners through discussion on the forum, students will thoroughly research the subject of their assigned issue and prepare a first and final draft of a comprehensive office memorandum. The memorandum will be reviewed by both ABI Law Review student editors and the instructor. Their feedback will guide students through the revision process. Evaluation will be based on the quality of the research and writing, as well as participation in writing workshops conducted during the semester. Students using this course to satisfy the Advanced Practice Writing Requirement may not use a paper on the same subject to satisfy the Advanced Scholarly Writing Requirement.

INTRODUCTION TO INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
(INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY - 2010)
2 credits
Open only to students who have not yet taken Copyright Law, Trademarks and Copyrights Survey, Trademarks and Unfair Competition or Patent Law. This is a survey course in intellectual property law. Students will learn the basic doctrines of the three major federal regimes of intellectual property (copyright, trademarks, and patents), as well as their historical and theoretical foundations. The course is a pre-requisite to further study in intellectual property. Grades will be based on a final examination.

INTRODUCTION TO LAW
(LEGAL METHOD - 1000)
2 credits
This course introduces methods and ideas that are fundamental components of the American legal system, with an emphasis on case law analysis and statutory interpretation. A passing grade requires regular attendance and satisfactory completion of several writing assignments.

INTRODUCTION TO TLP
(TRANSNATIONAL LEGAL PRACTICE – 1050)
1 credit
This course introduces TLP students to methods and ideas that are fundamental components of the American legal system, with an emphasis on case law analysis and statutory interpretation.  A passing grade requires regular attendance and satisfactory completion of several writing assignments.

INTRODUCTION TO U.S. LAW
(US LEGAL STUDIES FOREIGN LAW GRADUATE - 1000)
2 credits
Introduction to United States law is a course designed for LL.M. students in the Master of Laws program who have received their law degrees from foreign universities. The course provides an overview of various areas of United States law, of the U.S. legal profession, and of the U.S. judicial process. It is an introduction to the common and statutory law of the U.S. federal and state systems of law, designed to develop students' knowledge of United States legal concepts and issues in order to broaden and deepen their understanding of United States law and its process. The course will examine civil procedure, torts, contracts, property, criminal law and constitutional law. It will emphasize areas in which United States law is distinct from that of many other nations, including the federal system, judicial review, rights of those accused of crime, jury trials, punitive damages and constitutional protection of religious freedom. Class attendance is required, and students are expected to be prepared. Grades will be based upon a final exam and class participation.

ISSUES OF RACE & GENDER IN LAW
(INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS - 1050)
2 credits
This course will review Feminist Legal Theory, and Critical Race Theory and their development using recent legal, social and political commentary and case law. Topics studied will include feminist and critical race method, equality, privacy, gender/race-based discrimination, the intersections of race/gender/ethnicity, sexual harassment, hate speech, and pornography. Grades are based upon a research paper.