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THE GLOBAL FINANCIAL CRISIS
(BANKRUPTCY LAW - 5030)
2 credits
Although the current economic crisis is global in scope, insolvency laws vary greatly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. This course will explore the different legal approaches that various jurisdictions apply to insolvency issues. The course will explore both the insolvency systems that apply to consumers and those applicable to business entities. In addition to the comparative law approach, the course will also look at the insolvency of multi-national business enterprises and consider whether and to what extent the rules and proceedings in different jurisdictions can be harmonized in cases of entities with operations in multiple nations. Grades will be based on a final examination. Open to J.D. students.

GLOBAL LAW FELLOWS RESEARCH COLLOQUIUM TUTORIAL
(DIRECTED RESEARCH - 1070)
1 credit
This colloquium is designed to provide an academic peer group for visiting foreign researchers participating in the Global Law Fellows program, specialized instruction in American and English language materials, and an opportunity for Global Fellows to share progress of their research. In addition to regular presentations by the Global Fellows on their research projects, the colloquium will include instruction in use of electronic search services, structure of U.S. reporters and other standard legal materials, proper citation, U.S. law journal publication standards, and other research-related subjects. Each Global Law Fellow will give a substantial presentation on his or her research project during the course of the semester. If, in any given semester, there is only one Global Fellow, this course will be administered as a tutorial. This is a pass/fail course.

GLOBAL PHILANTHROPY & U.S. AID
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 3020)
3 credits
Treaties, U.S. and foreign laws, policies, politics, and cultural issues drive the U.S. government's international assistance programs, as well as the agendas and decisions of U.S.-based private foundations and public charities, including international nongovernmental organizations, involved in global philanthropy and assistance for under- developed countries and their people. Understanding relevant laws and regulations, appreciating politics and pertinent cultural issues, grasping policy implications for both the U.S. and foreign countries is key to the development of the assistance projects of our government and nonprofit sector. This course will offer students insights into, and permit them to explore, important aspects of these foundational tools and systems. Grades will be based on a final paper.