A

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z 

 

ACCOUNTING FOR LAWYERS
(BUSINESS AND FINANCE LAW - 1000)
2 credits
Open only to students who have taken no prior courses in accounting, i.e., a single prior undergraduate or post-graduate course in accounting renders a student ineligible. The course provides a basic introduction to accounting principles. The goal of the course is to provide knowledge to assist in counseling with respect to such areas as taxation, estates and mergers and acquisitions. Grades are based upon a final examination.

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW
(ADMINISTRATIVE LAW & GOVERNMENT REGULATION - 1000)
3 credits
This course explores the administrative process in executive and independent regulatory agencies with emphasis on judicial review. Consideration is given to the powers vested in administrative bodies and to the constitutional, statutory and other legal limitations on agency decision making. Grades are based upon a final examination.  Pre-requisite: CONSTITUTIONAL LAW.  Administrative Law satisfied both a core elective requirement and the Advanced Civil Procedure Requirement.

ADMIRALTY LAW
(INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW - 1000)
2 credits
This course deals with the basic considerations of Maritime Law and covers the areas of jurisdiction, maritime liens, priority and discharge of liens, personal injury and wrongful death as it relates to seamen, longshoremen and other harbor-workers and invitees, the Longshoremen and Harbor Workers Compensation Act, charters, bills of lading, the Harter Act and Carriage of Goods by Sea Act, salvage, general average, marine insurance, collision, limitation of liability, pilotage and marine pollution liability. Grades are based upon a final examination.

ADVANCED BANKRUPTCY RESEARCH SEMINAR-PART I
(BANKRUPTCY LAW - 1020)
3 credits
This seminar is devoted entirely to the preparation by the student of a Master's thesis. The professor will work closely with each student as the student selects the topic, performs the research and writes the thesis. The professor will also assist in the process of obtaining a publication commitment for the completed thesis and in arranging the panel of experts who will hear the defense of the thesis. There will be individual meetings for each student with the professor on a bi-weekly basis and approximately six meetings of the entire seminar to discuss student progress and to analyze the subject matter of each thesis. Each student will have an outside mentor who is an expert in the subject area of the thesis, who will review the work during the drafting stage and provide suggestions and additional direction. Open to LL.M. students only.

ADVANCED BANKRUPTCY RESEARCH SEMINAR-PART II
(BANKRUPTCY LAW - 1030)
3 credits
This seminar is devoted entirely to the preparation by the student of a Master's thesis. The professor will work closely with each student as the student selects the topic, performs the research and writes the thesis. The professor will also assist in the process of obtaining a publication commitment for the completed thesis and in arranging the panel of experts who will hear the defense of the thesis. There will be individual meetings for each student with the professor on a bi-weekly basis and approximately six meetings of the entire seminar to discuss student progress and to analyze the subject matter of each thesis. Each student will have an outside mentor who is an expert in the subject area of the thesis, who will review the work during the drafting stage and provide suggestions and additional direction. Open to LL.M. students only.  Pre-requisite: ADVANCED BANKRUPTCY RESEARCH SEMINAR-PART I

ADVANCED BANKRUPTCY RESEARCH SEMINAR-PART III
(BANKRUPTCY LAW - 3050)
3 credits
For late completion of Master's thesis. This seminar is devoted entirely to the preparation by the student of a Master's thesis. The professor will work closely with each student as the student selects the topic, performs the research and writes the thesis. The professor will also assist in the process of obtaining a publication commitment for the completed thesis and in arranging the panel of experts who will hear the defense of the thesis. There will be individual meetings for each student with the professor on a bi-weekly basis and approximately six meetings of the entire seminar to discuss student progress and to analyze the subject matter of each thesis. Each student will have an outside mentor who is an expert in the subject area of the thesis, who will review the work during the drafting stage and provide suggestions and additional direction. Open to LL.M. students only.

ADVANCED CLINIC PRACTICE
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS - 9080)
2 credits
Many students who participate in the Consumer Justice for the Elderly: Litigation, Securities Arbitration, Child Advocacy, and Bread and Life: Immigration clinics express a desire to continue their work in the clinic for another semester. This course allows former clinic students to apply to work in the clinic for an additional semester for credit. Each of the three clinics will accept no more than 2 former students each semester. Students will work in the clinic for 13 hours a week. Faculty supervision will include weekly meetings with students to discuss casework and further development of skills and case rounds. During the semester, each advanced clinic student will have the opportunity to refine the skills they have learned, acquire new skills, and mentor new students. Interested students will apply to the appropriate clinic and will be chosen by the clinical faculty.  Pre-requisite: CONSUMER JUSTICE FOR THE ELDERLY: LITIGATION CLINIC OR CHILD ADVOCACY CLINIC OR SECURITIES ARBITRATION CLINIC OR BREAD AND LIFE: IMMIGRATION CLINIC

ADVANCED CLINIC PRACTICE (SUMMER)
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS - 9090)
2 credits
The Consumer Justice for the Elderly: Litigation, Securities Arbitration, Child Advocacy and Bread and Life: Immigration clinics continue to provide representation to existing clients during the summer. Students who have already participated in one of these four clinics are eligible to enroll in the Advanced Clinic. The summer students will work on clinic cases and initiatives. Students will have the opportunity to further develop and refine their lawyering skills and to develop new skills. Each student will work in the clinic for 26 hours a week, if participation is for the 7 week summer school program. For students who participate in the 9 week summer school program, they will be required to work 20 hours a week. Faculty supervision will include weekly meetings with students to discuss casework and further development of skills and case rounds. Interested students will apply to the appropriate clinic and will be chosen by the clinical faculty.  Pre-requisite: CONSUMER JUSTICE FOR THE ELDERLY: LITIGATION CLINIC OR SECURITIES ARBITRATION CLINIC OR CHILD ADVOCACY CLINIC OR BREAD AND LIFE: IMMIGRATION CLINIC

ADVANCED TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL & COMPARATIVE SPORTS LAW
(INTERNATIONAL SPORTS LAW - 1030)
2 credits
This course is taken by students in the International & Comparative Sports Law LL.M. program.  The Advanced Topics course has two main objectives:  (a) to give the students the opportunity to examine closely current and emerging topics in sports law by interacting with guest lecturers who are experienced practitioners and (b) to prepare the student for researching and writing the required LL.M. thesis in the second semester.  The topics of each year’s lectures will be adjusted to incorporate new and emerging issues, allowing students to confront current issues in sports law practice and consider practice-based impacts and solutions.  Possible topics in a given year may include athlete’s image rights and team’s IP rights, human rights law and sports, data protection, commercial sponsorship and merchandising, TV rights, gambling and sports, advanced skills in managing conflict, athlete career counseling, anti-doping and domestic law, unionization and labor relations, “good behavior”/morals clauses in sports contracts, free agency, and the challenges of amateurism in university sports.  The goal of this class is to impart a thorough understanding of current and emerging issues in sports law and the broader sports market, thus allowing students to gain the knowledge needed to successfully navigate real-world challenges they are likely to face in practice.  In addition, students will consider how to assist clients in exploiting opportunities – to grow the game or industry they are in, to create new marketing and merchandising opportunities, to safeguard and advance human rights, or to open sports opportunities to previously underserved communities.  During the semester the student must also make substantial progress in researching and drafting portions of the thesis.  In addition to classes on research and topic selection, the students will meet with their thesis advisor on a regular basis.  Successful completion of this course is mandatory for all students enrolled in the International & Comparative Sports Law program.  The grade for this course is based on the completion of two advanced topic comments of 5-7 pages each (25% each), and an initial thesis proposal, draft outline, partial thesis draft, and preliminary bibliography (50%).  

ADVANCED TORTS
(TORTS - 1050)
2 credits
Building on the basic Torts course, this foundation course will cover in depth those areas of Tort law not covered in Torts, including tortious interference with economic relations, marketplace falsehoods, unfair competition, publicity and privacy, defamation, tortious use of judicial process, and tortious interference with civil rights. Grades will be based on a final examination and class participation.

ADVANCED TRIAL ADVOCACY: WITNESS EXAM
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS - 6030)
3 credits
In this interactive course, students will increase their expertise in and understanding of theory of the case and witness examination. Using a number of fact patterns, students will learn to conduct objection-proof direct examinations and advanced cross-examination of both lay and expert witnesses. The techniques to be studied are applicable in both civil and criminal cases. Students will be graded on each simulated exercise and class participation.  Pre-requisite: TRIAL ADVOCACY - CRIMINAL OR TRIAL ADVOCACY (INTENSIVE) OR TRIAL ADVOCACY-CONCENTR. CIVIL OR TRIAL ADVOCACY-CONCENTR. CRIM

ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS - 1020)
2 credits
This course gives students an overview of the law and practice of the three primary forms of extrajudicial dispute resolution: negotiation, mediation, and arbitration.  The course includes both instruction in the legal doctrines regulating these forms of dispute resolution and exposure to the skills these processes require, through simulations, exercises, and other forms of experiential learning.  Grades are based on participation in class discussions and exercises, written assignments, and a final examination.

ANTITRUST LAWS & COMPETITION
(BUSINESS AND FINANCE LAW - 1010)
3 credits
This is a survey course dealing with the principal federal antitrust legislation, including the Sherman Act, Clayton Act, Federal Trade Commission Act, the Hart-Scott-Rodino Act and the Robinson-Patman Act. The course considers price fixing, conspiracies in restraint of trade, monopolization, horizontal and vertical mergers, refusals to deal, tying, exclusive dealing and price discrimination. Grades are based upon a final examination.

APPELLATE ADVOCACY
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS - 1030)
2 credits
This course covers the following aspects of New York Appellate Practice: scope of review; taking and perfecting the appeal; stays pending appeal; preparation of the appellate brief; argument of the appeal; disposition of the appeal; and motions for re-argument. Grades are based upon the preparation of an appellate brief and related papers on appellate argument.  Prerequisite: LEGAL WRITING II.

APPELLATE ADVOCACY MOOT COURT
(ADVOCACY AND LEGAL SKILLS - 1031)
3 credits
This course covers the following aspects of New York Appellate Practice: scope of review; taking and perfecting the appeal; stays pending appeal; preparation of the appellate brief; argument of the appeal; disposition of the appeal; and motions for re-argument.  Grades are based upon the preparation of an appellate brief and related papers on appellate argument.  Prerequisite: LEGAL WRITING II.

APPLIED LEGAL ANALYSIS PARTS I & II
(STATE AND FEDERAL PRACTICE - 3070/3080)
3 credits each
The course is a two-semester, six-credit course designed to prepare J.D. students for the Multistate Bar Exam ("MBE"), the Multistate Performance Test ("MPT"), and essay writing. The course will prepare students for the MBE by providing a comprehensive review of the six multistate subjects tested on the MBE and by developing the close reading and analytical skills necessary to perform well on the exam. The course will prepare students for the MPT by familiarizing them with the documents and skills typically tested on the MPT and by teaching them how to draft a well-organized, clear document in a ninety-minute time frame. Course enrollment would be required for, and limited to, those J.D. students identified by the administration as those who would benefit most from the course. The course is not designed to provide comprehensive preparation for the bar exam and is not a substitute for a bar review course.