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Academic and Cultural Advantage

In choosing which courses to offer abroad, we select from the most popular classes offered in New York—but with an international “twist.”

For example, our sections of “Survey of Art and Architecture in Italy” often meet in downtown Rome, where you’ll learn about historical landmarks like the Pantheon and St. Peter’s by exploring them with your professor—all while meeting a core requirement. Courses abroad often focus on experiential learning, whether through site visits, Academic Service-Learning, or city-based projects. It’s just another way to help you make the most of your experience, focusing your time on the amazing places where you’ll live and study.

Dynamic and Interactive Classes

Imagine sitting outside the Coliseum under the sunny Italian sky, drawing a piece of history as part of your “Italian Sketchbook” class. Or maybe you’re more interested in our Paris course on “Economics of Poverty & Income Inequality”, through which you’ll tackle complex social issues before heading out into the streets to feed the hungry? No matter the subject, our courses offer you local context — firmly embedded in the host city — for understanding the global framework of each discipline.  

Outstanding International Faculty

Our New York City departments, chairs, and faculty select their local colleagues based on their area of expertise, teaching excellence, and education — the majority of our professors have terminal degrees. Best of all, we ensure small class size to foster great in-class discussions and strong academic quality.  

A Broad Range of Classes in English to Meet (Nearly!) Every Student’s Needs

There’s no need to be fluent in your host city’s language.  After all, the majority of our classes (except language classes, of course) are taught in English. We offer a broad range of disciplines—from International Business, to Economics, to Theology and Philosophy—to make the semester work for you. Most courses also meet core requirements to make study abroad an option for nearly all St. John’s students.

We also offer several major-specific semester programs each year, including our 2nd and 6th year Pharmacy programs and special Discover the World options in Psychology and History.

The GLCC Component of our Campuses Abroad

In order to ensure the highest level of language acquisition, students registered for language class levels 1010, 1020, 2030 and 2040 on the Paris, Rome, or Seville campus are required to participate in weekly 30-minute practice and conversation sessions in small groups, under the guidance of a tutor. Students enrolled in a 1000-level course are required to partake in 1 hour of practice each week. In addition to the language practice requirement, tutors may engage students in optional cultural activities (paid for by the students), fostering a local learning community. These sessions are meant to mirror the language resources offered by the Global Language and Culture Center (GLCC) on the Queens campus. 

A full list of St. John's Semester Course descriptions can be found under the "Academics" section of each program listed below:*

*Please note that both online and internship courses may also be taken while studying abroad.

Valuable Internship Opportunities

St. John's international internship program offers students with advanced French, Spanish, or Italian language skills the opportunity to gain invaluable overseas work experience while immersed in an unrivaled environment for honing their foreign language skills.  Please note: students will need faculty approval in order to begin an internship. For more information, please visit our site on internships in Europe.

Earn a Minor in International Studies

The College of Professional Studies awards a minor in International Studies upon the satisfaction of 18 credits distributed among foreign language courses, courses with an international and/or comparative focus as their primary area of study, as well as other courses taken abroad.  Students of any college interested in a minor in International Studies should contact their advising dean.  A maximum of 3 credits may overlap between major & minor, or minor & minor.

The following courses may count toward the International Studies minor: ART 1095C, ART 1250,  ART 1775A, ART 1790A, ART 1795A, ECO 1320, ENG 2500, GOV 2650, GOV 3320, HMT 2025, IB 3341, PHI 2200C, PHI 3000C, THE 2810, THE 2850, THE 3305.  Courses in French, Italian and Spanish at the 3000-level and 4000-level also count.  Students may count 6-credits of foreign language study (1000-level and 2000-level).

Earn a minor in Global Studies

The Global Studies interdisciplinary minor consists of 18 credits distributed around core requirements, a capstone seminar, and three free electives in the student’s chosen area of specialization.  Students in the Global Studies minor are required to study abroad.  For a complete outline of the Global Studies minor, please see the full list of courses below, or contact Dr. Brian Lockey for more information. 

Building Intercultural Competence While Abroad

The Council of Europe has identified intercultural competence as a critical skill that should be at the core of any international education curriculum, describing intercultural competence as “the specific attitudes, knowledge, understanding, skills and actions which together enable individuals to understand themselves and others in a context of diversity, and to interact and communicate with those who are perceived to have different cultural affiliations from their own.” 

That's why the Office of Global Studies requires that students participating in our study abroad opportunities also attend The Cultural Mentoring Program before they depart and while they are abroad.  To find out more about this unique program, click on the drop-down menu below: