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NASP Standards

1.1 - Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability: School psychologists have knowledge of varied models and methods of assessment that yield information useful in identifying strengths and needs, in understanding problems, and in measuring progress and accomplishments.  School psychologists use such models and methods as part of a systematic process to collect data and other information, translate assessment results into empirically-based decisions about service delivery, and evaluate the outcomes of services.  Data-based decision-making permeates every aspect of professional practice.

1.2 - Consultation and Collaboration: School psychologists have knowledge of behavioral, mental health, collaborative, and/or other consultation models and methods and of their application to particular situations.  School psychologists collaborate effectively with others in planning and decision-making processes at the individual, group, and system levels.

1.3 - Effective Instruction and Development of Cognitive/Academic Skills: School psychologists have knowledge of human learning processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of cognitive and academic skills.  School psychologists, in collaboration with others, develop appropriate cognitive and academic goals for students with different abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions.  Such interventions include, but are not limited to, instructional interventions and consultation.

1.4 - Socialization and Development of Life Skills: School psychologists have knowledge of human developmental processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social skills.  School psychologists, in collaboration with others, develop appropriate behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social goals for students of varying abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions.  Such interventions include, but are not limited to, consultation, behavioral assessment/intervention, and counseling.

1.5 - Student Diversity in Development and Learning: School psychologists have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, and disabilities and of the potential influence of biological, social, cultural, ethnic, experiential, socioeconomic, gender-related, and linguistic factors in development and learning.  School psychologists demonstrate the sensitivity and skills needed to work with individuals of diverse characteristics and to implement strategies selected and/or adapted based on individual characteristics, strengths, and needs.

1.6 - School and Systems Organization, Policy Development, and Climate: School psychologists have knowledge of general education, special education, and other educational and related services.  They understand schools and other settings as systems.  School psychologists work with individuals and groups to facilitate policies and practices that create and maintain safe, supportive, and effective learning environments for children and others.

1.7 - Prevention, Crisis Intervention, and Mental Health: School psychologists have knowledge of human development and psychopathology and of associated biological, cultural, and social influences on human behavior.  School psychologists provide or contribute to prevention and intervention programs that promote the mental health and physical well-being of students.

1.8 - Home/School/Community Collaboration: School psychologists have knowledge of family systems, including family strengths and influences on student development, learning, and behavior, and of methods to involve families in education and service delivery.  School psychologists work effectively with families, educators, and others in the community to promote and provide comprehensive services to children and families.

1.9 - Research and Program Evaluation: School psychologists have knowledge of research, statistics, and evaluation methods.  School psychologists evaluate research, translate research into practice, and understand research design and statistics in sufficient depth to plan and conduct investigations and program evaluations for improvement of services.

1.10 - School Psychology Practice and Development: School psychologists have knowledge of the history and foundations of their profession; of various service models and methods; of public policy development applicable to services to children and families; and of ethical, professional, and legal standards.  School psychologists practice in ways that are consistent with applicable standards, are involved in their profession, and have the knowledge and skills needed to acquire career-long professional development.

1.11 - Information Technology: School psychologists have knowledge of information sources and technology relevant to their work.  School psychologists access, evaluate, and utilize information sources and technology in ways that safeguard or enhance the quality of services.