International Communication, Master of Science

36 Credits
College of Professional Studies
Queens Campus

Overview

The centrality of media and communication drives the globalized economy. In this context knowledge of international relations and of the political economy of media is essential. Globalized economy driven by information and communication technologies increasingly is mindful of human rights and integral human development.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment for global communication specialists will be strong through 2018. The field spans such vital areas as public relations, journalism, strategic marketing, speechwriting, public policy and higher education.

You can prepare for these exciting opportunities through the new Master of Science in International Communication at St. John’s University. Offered by the College of Professional Studies, the program is designed to enable students to become global communications leaders in a variety of multinational and transnational corporations, non-governmental corporations, federal government agencies, and other major corporations.

The new program is one of the first advanced-level interdisciplinary, international communication programs in the nation.

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Courses

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Admission

Admission into the Master of Science in International Communication is contingent upon an assessment of the candidate’s ability to successfully pursue graduate study.

Ability is demonstrated by previous academic performance, letters of recommendation and other factors that suggest academic potential and motivation.

Degree candidate must provide the following for admission consideration:

  • Evidence of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university including official transcripts from each institution attended.
  • Must have minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Two letters of recommendation from instructors/professors or other qualified individuals.
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Success Story

Associate Professor and Chair, Computer Science, Mathematics and Science
Motivated by Pope John Paul II, Computer Science Chair Looks to Inspire Others