Administrative Studies, Bachelor of Science

126 Credits
College of Professional Studies
Queens Campus, Staten Island Campus, Online

Overview

The Bachelor of Science in Administrative Studies is designed to prepare students for administrative and managerial jobs in today's technologically oriented workplace.  With a solid grounding in writing, critical thinking, office software systems and a basic understanding of the business world, program graduates will be prepared for professional level positions in both the private and public sectors of the economy.

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Courses

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Admission

Undergraduate admission is based on many factors, including previous academic performance, satisfactory achievement on standardized tests, personal recommendations, and other indications of an applicant's interests, motivation, and potential.

 

 

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Career Outcomes

The program in Administrative Studies prepares students for entry-level positions in the world of business, with special emphasis on the development of critical thinking skills, analytic problem-solving skills, interpersonal communication skills, and the technical skills to perform their jobs in today’s high performance workplace.

The Administrative Studies program will prepare graduates to:

Understand of the nature of business.

  • Describe the basic principles of business including: marketplace, supply and demand, profit and loss, the business cycle, etc.
  • Explain the principles of capitalism including its goals, its dynamics and its positive and negative aspects.
  • Explain the various social and business perspectives as they pertain to present conditions, e.g. Taylorism, Post Industrialism, etc.
  • Explain the critical perspectives related to the field of business such as: Marxist-socialist perspectives, structural-functionalism, and post-modernism.

Understand administration and its role in business.

  • Summarize the basic principles of business and their application in creating an efficient workplace.
  • Evaluate various schools of thought in administration and predict possible outcomes of each.
  • Identify examples of bureaucracy, matrix management, proprietorships and other management structures.
  • Define and explain “Scientific Management,” the human relations school, and transience in the work place.
  • Compare and contrast Scientific Management and human relations approaches to administrative management.

Understand the principles of human resource management and their application to the workplace.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of human resource management principles.
  • Use those principles to explain and resolve problems in the workplace.
  • Analyze and resolve work performance dilemmas.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of several theories of motivation in the workplace.
  • Identify the issues involved in performance management.
  • Identify elements of workplace climate and culture.
  • Collaborate in teams to resolve work performance dilemmas.

Work effectively with people both individually and in groups/teams.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of individual and group communication.
  • Use knowledge of group dynamics to solve interpersonal problems.
  • Construct group dynamics exercises that are applicable to human synergy.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the various styles of communication and identify your own communication style, including its advantages and disadvantages.

Demonstrate knowledge of the dynamics of multiculturalism in the workplace.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the social science concepts and theories associated with race and ethnicity including: racism, prejudice, discrimination, stereotyping, ethnocentrism, ethnogenesis, pluralism, etc.
  • Describe and apply the techniques for establishing and maintaining a racially, ethnically and sexually sensitive workplace.

Demonstrate the skills to use the technology in the current and future workplace.

  • Use computer applications commonly used in the workplace.
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate ongoing needs for technology solutions with Information Technology staff

Demonstrate effective communication skills.

  • Write clear and effective information for business applications (letters, memos, e-mail, etc.).
  • Read and interpret theoretical and business material.
  • Demonstrate and apply the principles of negotiation.
  • Present material orally in a clear and concise manner.

Demonstrate the ability to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of organizations.

  • Articulate the importance of organizational measurement.
  • Identify the applications of various organizational measurements.
  • Evaluate several organizational metrics, using spread sheets, graphs and cross-tabulations to interpret results.
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