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The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled that police officers don't necessarily violate a person's constitutional rights when they stop a car based on a mistaken understanding of the law. Prof. John Q. Barrett weighs in.
At the NYT DealBook, Prof. Michael Perino weighs in on the Second Circuit's latest effort to define the parameters of insider trading, "perhaps our most symbolic white-collar crime."
Plains Dealer consumer affairs columnist Sheryl Harris reports on a consumer contract arbitration clause study conducted recently by St. John's Law faculty members.
At a recent event that brought alumni, students, faculty, and friends of the Law School together at St. John’s new Manhattan campus, Professor Mark L. Movsesian discussed the ongoing plight of Mideast Christians.
Real estate investment trust Rayonier Inc. faces class-action lawsuits on behalf of shareholders claiming that the company violated federal securities laws. Professor Michael Perino weighs in on the prospects for settlement.
Earlier this month, the Intellectual Property Law Center (IPLC) held its inaugural conference, bringing students, faculty, and leading experts together for a discussion about the legal implications of intelligent machines.
St. John's Law professors Elayne E. Greenberg, Paul F. Kirgis, and Jeff Sovern, along with their colleague from St. John's University, Yuxiang Liu, recently completed a study of consumer understanding of arbitration agreements to test the widespread assumption that consumers unwittingly agree to arbitration provisions.Their findings are set out in their article "'Whimsy Little Contracts' with Unexpected Consequences: An Empirical Analysis of Consumer Understanding of Arbitration Agreements," that is posted at SSRN.
According to a study by Jeff Sovern scheduled for publication in the University of Pittsburgh Law Review, consumers rarely exercise their right to cancel a contract for goods or services.
This summer, four undergraduates begin teaching and conducting research overseas as 2014 Fulbright award recipients.
The Hague Convention requires the prompt repatriation of children under 16 years of age who were wrongfully removed by a parent from the country in which they had been living, except in certain very limited circumstances. These few exceptions form the basis for much of the Hague Convention litigation in the United States.

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