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Queens, NY (January 21, 2015) – Today, St. John’s University, the Estate of Dr. Sanford M. Bolton, a former St. John’s professor, and Dr. Spiridon Spireas, an alumnus of the school’s College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, announced the settlement of a lawsuit commenced in 2008 in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York.
St. John’s Law students took top honors in two student competitions sponsored by the New York State Bar Association’s (NYSBA) Labor and Employment Law Section.
Twenty undergraduate students from St. John’s Staten Island campus took a behind-the-scenes look at law enforcement and social justice in Italy when they traveled to Rome in December as part of the inaugural Vice Provost’s International Fellowship.
Jeffrey Grossmann '89SVC has been appointed interim dean of the College of Professional Studies (CPS), succeeding Kathleen Vouté MacDonald, Ed.D., who had been dean since 1994.
In addition to this tuition initiative, St. John’s has a tradition of helping students by awarding generous financial aid packages to qualified students.
During the January intersession, St. John's Law 1Ls learned the art and practice of negotiation hands on in the new, required Lawyering course.
Stephen A. Aron, Ph.D., a prolific author and scholar of the American West who believes in “bridging the divide” between academic and public history, has been named to the 2015 Peter P. and Margaret A. D’Angelo Endowed Chair in the Humanities at St. John’s University.
"We are the change that we seek." On January 20, 2015, St. John's Law students and faculty came together to share perspectives on race, justice, and the law.
Fifteen St. John’s Law students explored Ireland’s legal system, history, and culture as participants in the 10-day Dean’s Travel Study Program held during the January intersession.
Professor Jeff Sovern argues that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau should ban arbitration clauses in boilerplate consumer contracts because people generally don't understand them.

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